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V 



JE S O P'S FABLES. 

ILLUSTRATED BY 

ERNEST GRISET. 




THE OWL AND THE GRASSHOPPER. 



[Sse Page 199. 



/ESOP'S FABLES 



ILLUSTRATED BY 



ERNEST GRISET. 



WITH TEXT BASED CHIEFLY UPON 



CROXALL, LA FONTAINE, AND L'ESTRANGE. 



REVISED AND RE-WRITTEN BY 



J. B. RUN DELL. 



LONDON : 

CASSELL, FETTER, AND GALFIN 

AND 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 



EDITOR'S PREFACE. 



" 'Twas the Golden Age, when every brute 
Had voice articulate, in speech was skilled, 
And the mid-forests with its synods filled. 
The tongues of rock and pine-leaf then were free ; 
To ship and sailor then would speak the sea ; 
Sparrows with farmers would shrewd talk maintain ; 
Earth gave all fruits, nor asked for toil again. 
Mortals and gods were wont to mix as friends. 
To which conclusion all the teaching tends 

Of sage old ysop." 

BABRIUS. Proem I. 

IT is probable that Fables which have passed current under 
the name of yEsop for two thousand years, will continue to bear 
his name as long as fables shall retain their power to instruct 
and charm in other words, as long as men remain in need 
of instruction and reproof, and are impatient of their recep 
tion. Truth, however, calls for the assertion, that the connection 
of JEsop with the collection known by his name is very slight. 
Nearly all that can be said with certainty is, " that there is 
abundant proof that fables passing under the name of -^Esop 
were current and popular in Athens during the most brilliant 
period of its literary history, and not much more than a century 
after the death of the supposed author." We are further told, on 
good authority, that of AL sop's works, " none are extant, and of 
his life scarcely anything is known." 

What is known of the life of ALsop is briefly this : He was 



EDITORS PREFACE. 



disfigured by unnecessary licence of expression, and now obsolete 
idiom. The second contains much quaint humour, but the Fables 
are of unequal merit, and at times are lengthy and somewhat 
wearisome. 

In revising these editions to suit modern tastes and current 
modes of expression, no principle has been followed save that 
of trying to exhibit each Fable in its liveliest and most attractive 
dress. To this end, in some cases, almost the exact words of 
Croxall and L' Estrange are given ; in others, the versions of these 
authors have been added to, altered, or curtailed ; while in not a 
few the dress is almost, if not altogether, new. 

J. B. R. 




LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



THE OWL AND THE GRASSHOPPER 

Frontispiece 

THE Two FROGS i 

THE STAG LOOKING INTO THE POOL 3 j 

THE WOLF AND THE LAMB 5 

THE CAT AND THE MICE 8 

THE DOG AND HIS SHADOW ... 9 

THE STAG IN THE OX-STALL ... 11 

THE HAWK AND THE NIGHTINGALE 13 

THE COUNTRYMAN AND THE SNAKE 17 

THE WIND AND THE SUN 19 

THE LION AND THE MOUSE ... 21 

THE LEOPARD AND THE Fox ... 25 

THE WOLF AND THE CRANE ... 29 
THE EAGLE, THE CAT, AND THE 

Sow 32 

THE Fox AND THE STORK 33 

THE TRAVELLER AND THE BEAR ... 37 

THE Fox AND THE SICK LION ... 41 

THE Fox WITHOUT A TAIL 45 

THE MAN AND HIS GOOSE ... ... 48 

THE PEACOCK AND THE CRANE ... 49 

THE Fox AND THE MASK 51 

THE LION, THE TIGER, AND THE Fox 53 

THE VAIN JACKDAW ... 57 

THE Fox AND THE JACKDAW ... 59 

THE Fox AND THE COUNTRYMAN... 61 

THE Ass, THE DOG, AND THE WOLF 64 

THE Fox AND THE APE 65 

THE MOUNTAIN IN LABOUR ... 69 

THE MOUSE AND THE WEASEL ... 71 



PAGE 

THE DOG IN THE MANGER 73 

THE FROGS DESIRING A KING ... 77 

THE HUSBANDMAN AND HIS SONS... 80 

THE BOAR AND THE Ass 81 

THE PORCUPINE AND THE SNAKES 82 

THE EAGLE AND THE Fox 85 

THE LARK AND HER YOUNG ONES 89 

THE GOATHERD AND THE SHE-GOAT 91 

MERCURY AND THE WOODMAN ... 93 
THE TOWN MOUSE AND THE COUNTRY 

MOUSE 97 

THE PEACOCK AND THE MAGPIE ... 99 

THE Fox AND. THE GRAPES 101 

THE SENSIBLE Ass ... 105 

THE EAGLE AND THE CROW ... 109 

THE GNAT AND THE BULL 112 

THE FOWLER AND THE BLACKBIRD 113 

THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE ... 115 

THE Fox AND THE BOAR ... ... 117 

THE OLD MAN AND DEATH ... 121 

THE WOLF IN SHEEP'S CLOTHING... 123 

THE COVETOUS MAN 125 

THE ANGLER AND THE LITTLE FISH 129 

THE Fox AND THE COCK 133 

THE LION, THE Fox, AND THE WOLF 136 

THE MAN AND HIS WOODEN GOD... 137 

THE KNIGHT AND HIS CHARGER ... 139 

THE BEAR AND THE BEEHIVES ... 141 

THE ANTS AND THE GRASSHOPPER 145 

THE LION AND THE ELEPHANT ... 147 

THE WOLVES AND THE SICK Ass ... 149 



Xll 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



PAGE 

THE SPARROW AND THE HARE ... 153 

THE Ass CARRYING AN IDOL ... 155 

THE KID AND THE WOLF 157 

THE HORSE AND THE LION ... 161 

THE OLD HOUND 165 

^SOP AND HIS FELLOW-SERVANTS 168 

THE FOWLER AND THE LARK ... 169 

THE GOAT AND THE LION 173 

THE LOCUSTS AND THE GRASS 
HOPPER 176 

THE WOLF, THE SHE-GOAT, AND THE 

KID " 177 

THE Fox AND THE CROW 181 

THE SEA AND THE RIVERS 184 

THE Fox AND THE LION 185 

THE Ass AND THE LION HUNTING 189 

THE Fox AND THE HEDGEHOG ... 192 

THE CAT AND THE Fox 193 

THE MASTER AND THE SCHOLAR ... 195 

THE FROG AND THE Fox : 197 



THE OLD WOMAN AND THE EMPTY 

CASK 200 

THE SATYR AND THE TRAVELLER 201 

THE WOLF AND THE MASTIFF ... 205 
THE Two TRAVELLERS AND THE 

OYSTER 208 

THE Ass IN THE LION'S SKIN ... 209 

THE MAID AND THE PAIL OF MILK 211 

THE THIEF AND THE DOG 213 

THE CROW AND THE PITCHER ... 217 

THE LION AND THE FOUR BULLS... 221 

THE EAGLE AND THE OWL 224 

THE MERRY -ANDREW AND THE 

COUNTRYMAN 225 

THE OLD MAN, HIS SON, AND THE 

Ass ... 227 

THE OLD LION 229 

THE FIR-TREE AND THE BRAMBLE 233 

THE NURSE AND THE WOLF ... 237 

THE ANT AND THE CHRYSALIS ... 240 




THE 



FABLES OF 



THE TWO FROGS. 

ONE hot summer, the lake in which two Frogs lived was 
completely dried up, and they were obliged to set off in 
search of water elsewhere. Coming to a deep and 
deliciously cool well, one of the Frogs proposed that they 
should jump in at once. "Wait a bit," cried the other; 
"if that should dry up, how could we get out again?" 



ors FABLES. 



JUPITER AND THE CAMEL. 

THE Camel once upon a time complained to Jupiter that 
he was not as well served as he ought to be in the means 
of defence and offence. " The bull," said he, " has horns, 
the boar, tusks, and the lion and tiger, formidable claws 
and fangs that make them feared and respected on all 
sides. I, on the other hand, have to put up with the 
abuse of all who choose to insult me." Jupiter angrily 
told him that if he would take the trouble to think, he 
would see that he was endowed with qualities shared by 
no other beast ; but that, as a punishment for his un 
reasonable importunity, henceforward his ears should be 
shortened. 



THE LION HUNTING WITH OTHER 

BEASTS. 

A LION, a Heifer, a Goat, and a Sheep once agreed to 
share whatever each might catch in hunting. A fine fat 
stag fell into a snare set by the Goat, who thereupon called 
the rest together. The Lion divided the stag into four 
parts. Taking the best piece for himself, he said, " This 
is mine of course, as I am the Lion;" taking another 
portion, he added, " This too is mine by right the right, 
if you must know, of the strongest." .Further, putting 
aside the third piece, "That's for the most valiant," said 
he ; " and as for the remaining part, touch it if you dare." 



THE STAG LOOKING INTO THE POOL. 



THE STAG LOOKING INTO THE POOL. 

A STAG drinking at a clear pool, admired the handsome 
look of his spreading antlers, but was much displeased at 
the slim and ungainly appearance of his legs. " What a 
glorious pair of branching horns ! " said he. " How grace 
fully they hang over my forehead ! What an agreeable air 
they give my face ! But as for my spindle-shanks of legs, 
I am heartily ashamed of them." The words were scarcely 
out of his mouth, when he saw some huntsmen and a pack 
of hounds making towards him. His despised legs soon 
placed him at a distance from his followers, but, on 
entering the forest, his horns got entangled at every turn, 
so that the dosfs soon reached him and made an end of 

o 

him. "Mistaken fool that I was!" he exclaimed; "had 
it not been for these wretched horns my legs would have 
saved my life." 




^ sors FABLES. 



THE COCK AND THE JEWEL. 

A BRISK young Cock scratching for something with which 
to entertain his favourite hens, happened to turn up a jewel. 
Feeling quite sure that it was something precious, but not 
knowing well what to do with it, he addressed it with an 
air of affected wisdom as follows : " You are a very fine 
thing, no doubt, but you are not at all to my taste. For 
my part, I would rather have one grain of dear delicious 
barley than all the jewels in the world." 



THE WOLF AND THE LAMB. 

A HUNGRY Wolf one day saw a Lamb drinking at a 
stream, and wished to frame some plausible excuse for 
making him his prey. " What do you mean by muddling 
the water I am going to drink ? " fiercely said he to the 
Lamb. " Pray forgive me," meekly answered the Lamb ; 
" I should be sorry in any way to displease you, but as 
the stream runs from you towards me, you will see that 
such cannot be the case." " That's all very well," said the 
Wolf; "but you know you spoke ill of me behind my 
back a year ago/' " Nay, believe me," replied the Lamb, 
" I was not then born." " It must have been your 
brother then," growled the Wolf. " It cannot have been, 
for I never had any," answered the Lamb. " I know it 
was one of your lot," rejoined the Wolf, " so make no 
more such idle excuses." He then seized the poor Lamb, 
carried him off to the woods, and ate him. 




THE WOLF AND THE LAMD 



THE CAT AND THE MICE. 



THE PEACOCK'S COMPLAINT. 

THE Peacock complained to Juno that while every one 
laughed at his voice, an insignificant creature like the 
Nightingale had a note that delighted everybody. Juno, 
angry at the unreasonableness of her favourite bird, scolded 
him in the following terms : " Envious bird that you are, 
I am sure you have no cause to complain. On your neck 
shine all the colours of the rainbow, and your extended 
tail shows like a mass of gems. No living being has 
every good thing to its own share. The falcon is endowed 
with swiftness, the eagle, strength, the parrot, speech, the 
raven, the gift of augury, and the nightingale with a 
melodious note, while you have both size and beauty. 
Cease then to complain, or the gifts you have shall be 
taken away." 



THE CAT AND THE MICE. 

A CERTAIN house was much infested by Mice ; the owner 
brought home a Cat, a famous mouser, who soon made 
such havoc amon^ the little folk, that those who remained 

o 

resolved they would never leave the upper shelves. The 
Cat grew hungry and thin in consequence, and, driven to 



FABLES. 



her wit's end, hung by her hind legs to a peg in the wall, 
and pretended to be dead. An old Mouse came to the 
edge of the shelf, and, seeing through the deception, cried 
out, " Ah, ah, Mrs. Pussy ! We should not come near 
you, even if your skin w r ere stuffed w r ith straw." 




THE ANT AND THE FLY. 




THE DOG AND HIS SHADOW. 

A DOG, bearing in his mouth a piece of meat that he had 
stolen, was crossing a smooth stream by means of a plank. 
Looking in, he saw what he took to be another dog 
carrying another piece of meat. Snapping greedily to get 
this as well, he let go the meat that he had, and lost it in 
the stream. 



THE ANT AND THE FLY. 

Ax Ant and a Fly one day disputed as to their respective 
merits. " Vile creeping insect ! " said the Fly to the Ant, 
" can you for a moment compare yourself with me ? I 
soar on the wing like a bird. I enter the palaces of 
kings, and alight on the heads of princes, nay, of emperors, 



I0 s SOP'S FABLES. 



and only quit them to adorn the yet more attractive brow 
of beauty. Besides, I visit the altars of the gods. Not 
a sacrifice is offered but ' is first tasted by me. Every 
feast, too, is open to me. I eat and drink of the best, 
instead of living for days on two or three grains of corn 
as you do." "All that's very fine," replied the Ant; " but 
listen to me. You boast of your feasting, but you know 
that your diet is not always so choice, and you are some 
times forced to eat what nothing should induce me to 
touch. As for alighting on the heads of kings and 
emperors, you know very well that whether you pitch on 
the head of an emperor, or of an ass (and it is as often on 
the one as the other), you are shaken off from both with 
impatience. And, then, the ' altars of the gods,' indeed ! 
There and everywhere else you are looked upon as 
nothing but a nuisance. In the winter, too, while I feed 
at my ease on the fruit of my toil, what more common 
than to see your friends dying with cold, hunger, and 
fatigue? I lose my time now in talking to you. Chat 
tering will fill neither my bin nor my cupboard." 



THE STAG IN THE OX-STALL. 

A STAG, hard pressed by the hounds, ran for shelter 
into an ox-stall, the door of which was open. One of the 
Oxen turned round, and asked him why he came to such a 
place as that, where he would be sure to be taken. The 
Stag replied that he should do well enough if the Oxen 



THE STAG IN THE OX-STALL. n 

would not tell of him, and, covering himself in a heap of 
straw, waited for the night. Several servants, and even 
the Farm -Bailiff himself, came and looked round, but 
saw nothing of the Stag, who, as each went away, was 
ready to jump out of his skin for joy, and warmly thanked 
the Oxen for their silence. The Ox who had spoken first 
to him warned him not to be too sure of his escape, and 
said that glad as they would all be for him to get away, 
there was a certain person still to come whose eyes were a 
deal sharper than the eyes of any one who had been there 
yet. This was the Master himself, who, having been 
dining with a neighbour, looked in on his way home to see 
that all was right. At a glance he saw the tips of the horns 
coming through the straw, whereupon he raised a hue and 
cry, called all his people together, and made a prize of 
the Stag. 




12 sEsors FABLES. 



THE FROG WHO WISHED TO BE AS BIG AS 

AN OX. 

AN Ox grazing in a meadow, chanced to set his foot on a 
young Frog and crushed him to death. His brothers and 
sisters, who were playing near, at once ran to tell their 
mother what had happened. " The monster that did it, 
mother, was such a size ! " said they. The mother, who 
was a vain old thing, thought that she could easily make 
herself as large. "Was it as big as this?" she asked, 
blowing and puffing herself out. " Oh, much bigger than 
that," replied the young Frogs. "As this then?" cried 
she, puffing and blowing again with all her might. " Nay, 
mother," said they; "if you were to try till you burst 
yourself, you would never be so big." The silly old Frog 
tried to puff herself out still more, and burst herself indeed. 



THE HAWK AND THE NIGHTINGALE. 

A NIGHTINGALE once fell into the clutches of a hungry 
Hawk who had been all day on. the look-out for food. 
" Pray let me go," said the Nightingale, " I am such a 
mite for a stomach like yours. I sing so nicely too. Do 
let me go, it will do you good to hear me." " Much good 
it will do to an empty belly," replied the Hawk, " and 
besides, a little bird that I have is more to me than a 
great one that has yet to be caught." 




THE HAWK AND THE NIGHTINGALE. 



THE KITE AND THE PIGEONS. 15 



THE BELLY AND THE MEMBERS. 

THE Members of the Body once rebelled against the 
Belly, who, they said, led an idle, lazy life at their 
expense. The Hands declared that they would not again 
lift a crust even to keep him from starving, the Mouth that 
it would not take in a bit more food, the Legs that they 
would carry him about no longer, and so on with the 
others. The Belly quietly allowed them to follow their 
own courses, well knowing that they would all soon come 
to their senses, as indeed they did, when, for want of the 
blood and nourishment supplied from the stomach, they 
found themselves fast becoming mere skin and bone. 



THE KITE AND THE PIGEONS. 

A KITE that had kept sailing around a dove-cote for many 
days to no purpose, was forced by hunger to have recourse 
to stratagem. Approaching the Pigeons in his gentlest 
manner, he tried to show them how much better their 
state would be if they had a king with some firmness about 
him, and how well his protection would shield them from 
the attacks of the Hawk and other enemies. The Pigeons, 
deluded by this show of reason, admitted him to the dove 
cote as their king. They found, however, that he thought 
it part of his kingly prerogative to eat one of their number 
every day, and they soon repented of their credulity in 
having let him in. 



i6 SEsors FABLES. 



THE BALD KNIGHT. 

A CERTAIN Knight, who wore a wig to conceal his 
baldness, was out hunting one day. A sudden gust of 
wind carried away his wig, and showed his bald pate. 
His friends all laughed heartily at the odd figure he 
made, but the old fellow, so far from being put out, 
laughed as heartily as any of them. ff Is it any wonder," 
said he, " that another man's hair shouldn't keep on my 
head when my own wouldn't stay there ? " 



THE MAN AND THE LION. 

A MAN and a Lion once argued together as to which be 
longed to the nobler race. The former called the attention 
of the Lion to a monument on which was sculptured a Man 
striding over a vanquished Lion. " That proves nothing 
at all," said the Lion ; " if a Lion had been the carver, he 
would have made the Lion striding over the Man," 



THE COUNTRYMAN AND THE SNAKE. 




THE COUNTRYMAN AND THE SNAKE. 

A VILLAGER, one frosty day in the depth of winter, found a 
Snake under a hedge almost dead with the cold. Having 
pity on the poor creature, he brought it home, and laid it 
on the hearth near the fire. Revived by the heat, it reared 
itself up, and with dreadful hissings flew at the wife and 
children of its benefactor. The man, hearing their cries, 
rushed in, and with a mattock, which he brought in his 
hand, soon cut the Snake in pieces. " Vile wretch ! " said 
he ; " is this the reward you make to him who saved your 
life ? Die, as you deserve ; but a single death is too good 
for you." 



1 8 sEsors FABLES. 



THE MAN AND HIS TWO WIVES. 

IN a country where men could have more than one wife, a 
certain man, whose head was fast becoming white, had two, 
one a little older than himself, and one much younger. 
The young Wife, being of a gay and lively turn, did not 
want people to think that she had an old man for a 
husband, and so used to pull out as many of his white 
hairs as she could. The old Wife, on the other hand, did 
not wish to seem older than her husband, and so used to 
pull out the black hairs. This went on, until between them 
both, they made the poor man quite bald. 



THE FROGS AND THE FIGHTING BULLS, 

A FROG one day peeping out of a lake, saw two Bulls 
fighting at some distance off in the meadow. Calling to 
his companions, " My dear friends," said he, " whatever 
will become of us ?" " Why, what are you frightened at?" 
asked one of the Frogs ; " what can their quarrels have to 
do with us ? They are only fighting which shall be master 
of the herd." " True," answered the first, " and it is just 
that which causes my fear, for the one that is beaten will 
take refuge here in the marshes, and will tread us to death." 
And so it happened ; and many a Frog, in dying, had sore 
proof that the fears which he had thought to be groundless 
were not so in fact. 



THE WIND AND THE SUN. 



THE WIND AND THE SUN. 

A DISPUTE once arose between the North Wind and the 
Sun as to which was the stronger of the two. Seeing 
a traveller on his way, they agreed to try which could 
the sooner get his cloak off him. The North Wind 
began, and sent a furious blast, which, at the onset, 
nearly tore the cloak from its fastenings ; but the 
traveller, seizing the garment with a firm grip, held it 
round his body so tightly that Boreas spent his remaining 
force in vain. The Sun, dispelling the clouds that had 
gathered, then darted his most sultry beams on the 
traveller's head. Growing faint with the heat, the man 
flung off his cloak, and ran for protection to the nearest 
shade. 







20 sEsops FABLES. 



THE MISCHIEVOUS DOG. 

A CERTAIN man had a Dog which worried so many 
people, that he was obliged to fasten a heavy clog about 
his neck to stop him from such sport in future. This 
the stupid cur took to be a mark of honourable distinction, 
and grew so vain in consequence that he turned up his 
nose at all the dogs he met. A sly old fellow, however, 
assured him that so far from having any cause to be 
proud of his burden, it was, on the contrary, a sure sign 
of disgrace. 



THE LION AND THE MOUSE. 

A LION, tired with the chase, lay sleeping at full length 
under a shady tree. Some Mice scrambling over him 
while he slept, awoke him. Laying his paw upon one 
of them, he was about to crush him, but the Mouse 
implored his mercy in such moving terms that he let 
him go. Some time after, the Lion was caught in a net 
laid by some hunters, and, unable to free himself, made 
the forest resound with his roars. The Mouse whose 
life had been spared came, and with his little sharp teeth 
soon gnawed the ropes asunder, and set the Lion free. 




THE LION AND THE MOUSE. 



THE BROTHER AND SISTER. 



THE FATAL COURTSHIP. 

IT is said that the Mouse spoken of in the last Fable 
was so emboldened by the offers of friendship made to 
him by the Lion in return for his assistance, that he 
asked for the hand of his daughter in marriage. The 

o o 

Lion, amused at the request, good-humouredly told the 
Mouse he should plead his own cause, and called the 
young Lioness to come to him. She, bounding fonvard 
heedlessly, did not see her little lover, who was running 
to meet her, and one of her paws falling upon him, 
he was crushed to pieces. 



THE BROTHER AND SISTER. 

A CERTAIN man had two children, a boy and a girl. The 
lad was a handsome young fellow enough, but the girl was 
as plain as a girl can well be. The latter, provoked beyond 
endurance by the way in which her Brother looked in 
the glass and made remarks to her disadvantage, went to 
her father and complained of it. The father drew his 
children to him very tenderly, and said, " My dears, I 
wish you both to look in the glass every day. You, my 
son, that, seeing your face is handsome, you may take care 
not to spoil it by ill-temper and bad behaviour, and you, 
my daughter, that you may be encouraged to make up for 
your want of beauty by the sweetness of your manners, 
and the grace of your conversation." 



24 ^ SOP'S FABLES. 



THE BOASTING TRAVELLER. 

A MAN was one day entertaining a lot of fellows in an 
ale-house with an account of the wonders he had done 
when abroad on his travels. " I w r as once at Rhodes," 
said he, " and the people of Rhodes, you know, are famous 
for jumping. Well, I took a jump there that no other 
man could come within a yard of. That's a fact, and if 
we were there I could bring you ten men who would prove 
it." " What need is there to go to Rhodes for witnesses ?" 
asked one of his hearers; "just imagine that you are there 
now, and show us your leap." 



THE SPENDTHRIFT AND THE SWALLOW. 

A PRODIGAL young fellow, who had run through all his 
money, and even sold all his outer clothes except his 
cloak, seeing a Swallow skimming over the meadows one 
fine day in the early spring, believed that summer was 
really come, and sold his cloak too. The next morning 
there happened to be a severe frost, and, shivering and 
nearly frozen himself, he found the Swallow lying stiff and 
dead upon the ground. He thereupon upbraided the poor 
bird as the cause of all his misfortunes. " Stupid thing/' 
said he, " had you not come before your time, I should 
not now be so wretched as I am/' 



THE WANTON CALF. 




THE LEOPARD AND THE FOX. 

THE Leopard one day, in the hearing of the Fox, was 
very loud in the praise of his own beautifully spotted 
skin. The Fox thereupon told him that, handsome as 
he might be, he considered that he himself was yet a 
great deal handsomer. " Your beauty is of the body," 
said the Fox ; " mine is of the mind." 



THE WANTON CALF. 

A CALF, full of play and wantonness, seeing an Ox at the 
plough, could not forbear insulting him. " What a sorry 
poor drudge are you/' said he, ' to bear that heavy yoke 
upon your neck, and with a plough at your tail all day, 



26 ^E SOP'S FABLES. 



to go turning up the ground for a master. You are a 
wretched poor slave, and know no better, or you would 
not do it. See what a happy life I lead ; I go just where 
I please sometimes in the cool shade, sometimes in the 
warm sunshine ; and whenever I like I drink at the clear 
and running brook." The Ox, not at all moved by this 
address, went on quietly and calmly with his work, and 
in the evening, when unyoked and going to take his rest, 
he saw the Calf hung with garlands of flowers, being led 
off for sacrifice by the priests. He pitied him, but could 
not help saying, as he passed, " Now, friend, whose con 
dition is the better, yours or mine ?" 



THE JACKDAW AND THE PIGEONS. 

A JACKDAW seeing how well some Pigeons in a certain 
dove-cote fed, and how happily they lived together, wished 
much to join them. With this view he whitened his 
feathers, and slipped in one evening just as it was getting 
dark. As long as he kept quiet he escaped notice, but 
growing bolder by degrees, and feeling very jolly in his 
new quarters, he burst into a hearty laugh. His voice 
betrayed him. The Pigeons set upon him and drove 
him out. When he would afterwards have joined the 
Jackdaws again, his discoloured feathers and his battered 
state drew attention to him, and his former mates finding 
out what he had been at, would let him have no further 
part with them. 



THE SICK KITE. 



27 



THE HARES AND THE FROGS. 

THE Hares once took serious counsel among themselves 
whether death itself would not be preferable to their miser 
able condition. " What a sad state is ours," they said, 
" never to eat in comfort, to sleep ever in fear, to be startled 
by a shadow, and fly with beating heart at the rustling of 
the leaves. Better death by far;" and off they went accord 
ingly to drown themselves in a neighbouring lake. Some 
scores of Erogs who were enjoying the moonlight on the 
bank, scared at the approach of the Hares, jumped into the 
water. The splash awoke fresh fears in the breasts of 
the timid Hares, and they came to a full stop in their 
flight. One wise old fellow among them cried, " Hold, 
brothers ! See, weak and fearful as we are, beings exist 
that are more weak and fearful still. Why then should 
we seek to die ? Let us rather make the best of our lot, 
such as it is/' 



THE SICK KITE. 

A KITE who had been ill for a long time, begged of his 
mother to go to all the temples in the country, and see 
what prayers and promises could do for his recovery. The 
old Kite replied, " My son, unless you can think of an altar 
that neither of us has robbed, I fear that nothing can be 
done for you in that way." 



28 sE SOP'S FABLES. 



THE LION IN LOVE. 

A LION fell in love with the fair daughter of a forester, 
and demanded her of her father in marriage. The man 
durst not refuse, though he would gladly have done so ; 
but he told the Lion that his daughter was so young and 
delicate, that he could consent only upon condition that his 
teeth should first be drawn and his claws cut off. The 
Lion was so enslaved by love that he agreed to this 
without a murmur, and it was accordingly done. The 
forester then seized a club, laid him dead upon the spot 
and so broke off the match. 



THE WOLF AND THE CRANE. 

A WOLF devoured his prey so ravenously that a bone 
stuck in his throat, giving him great pain. He ran 
howling up and down, and offered to reward handsomely 
any one who would pull it out. A Crane, moved by pity 
as well as by the prospect of the money, undertook the 
dangerous task. Having removed the bone, he asked 
for the promised reward. "Reward!" cried the Wolf; 
" pray, you greedy fellow, what reward can you possibly 
require? You have had your head in my mouth, 
and instead of biting it off, I have let you pull it out un 
harmed. Get away with you, and don't come again within 
reach of my paw." 




THB WOLF AND THE CRANE. 



THE COLLIER AND THE FULLER. 31 



THE LION, THE ASS, AND THE FOX. 

THE Lion, the Ass, and the Fox went hunting together, 
and it was agreed that whatever was taken should be shared 
between them. They caught a large fat Stag, which the Lion 
ordered the Ass to divide. The Ass took a deal of pains to 
divide the Stag into three pieces, which should be as nearly 
equal as possible. The Lion, enraged with him for what he 
considered a want of proper respect to his quality, flew 
upon him and tore him to pieces. He then called on the 
Fox to divide. The Fox, nibbling off a small portion for 
himself, left the rest for the Lion's share. The Lion, highly 
pleased with this mark of respect, asked the Fox where he 
had learned such politeness and good-breeding. " To tell 
the truth, Sire/' replied the Fox, " I was taught it by the 
Ass that lies dead there." 



THE COLLIER AND THE FULLER. 

A FRIENDLY Collier meeting one day with a Fuller, an 
old acquaintance of his, kindly invited him to come and 
share his house. "A thousand thanks for your civility/' 
replied the Fuller; "but I am rather afraid that as fast 
as I make anything clean, you will be for smutting it 
again." 



32 ^ SOP'S FASLES. 



THE EAGLE, THE CAT, AND THE SOW. 

AN Eagle had built her nest in the top branches of an 
old oak tree ; a wild Cat dwelt in a hole about the middle ; 
and in the hollow part at the bottom lived a Sow with a 
whole litter of pigs. They might have remained there 
long in contentment, but the Cat, bent upon mischief, crept 
up one day to the Eagle, and said, " Neighbour, have you 
noticed what the old Sow who lives below is doing? 1 
believe she is determined upon nothing less than to root 
up this tree, our abode, and when it falls she will devour 
our young ones." This put the Eagle in a great fright, 
and she did not dare to stir from home lest the tree might 
fall in her absence. Descending to visit the Sow, the 
wily Cat said, " Listen to me, my friend. Last night I 
overheard that old bird who lives over our heads promise 
her young ones that the very next time you went out they 
should have one of your dear little porkers for supper," 
The Sow, greatly alarmed in her turn, durst not quit her 
hollow. The mutual fear of the Eagle and the Sow 
became so great that they and their young ones were 
actually starved to death, and fell a prey to the designing 
old Cat and her kittens. 




THE Fox AND THE STORK. 



33 







THE FOX AND THE STORK. 

A Fox one day invited a Stork to dine with him, and, 
wishing to be amused at his expense, put the soup which 
he had for dinner in a large flat dish, so that, while he 
himself could lap it up quite well, the Stork could only 
dip in the tips of his long bill. Some time after, the 
Stork, bearing his treatment in mind, invited the Fox to 
take dinner with him. He, in his turn, put some minced 
meat in a long and narrow-necked vessel, into which he 
could easily put his bill, while Master Fox was forced 
to be content with licking what ran down the sides of 
the vessel. The Fox then remembered his old trick, 
and could not but admit that the Stork had well paid 
him out. 



34 



FABLES. 



THE LIONESS AND THE FOX. 

Fox once observed to the Lioness that Foxes were 
very much to be envied in the matter of fruitfulness. 
Scarcely a year passed that she, for instance, did not bring 
into the world a good litter of cubs, while some people, 
she continued, who had only one young one at a time, and 
that not more than twice or thrice in their lives, looked 
down upon everybody else with contempt. This sneer was 
too pointed to be passed over in silence by the Lioness, 
who replied with a good deal of fire, " What you say is 
true ; you have a great many young at a time, and often ; 
but what are they ? Foxes. I have but one, but remember 
that that one is a Lion/' 



THE FOX AND THE GOAT. 

A Fox and a Goat once journeyed together. The Goat 
was a simple creature, seldom seeing beyond his own 
nose ; while the Fox, like most of his kind, was a master 
of knavery. They were led by thirst to descend a deep 
well, and when they had both drunk freely, the Fox 
said, "Now, master Goat, what shall we do? Drinking 
is all very well, but it won't get us out from here. You 
had better rear up against the wall ; then, by the aid of 
your horns, I can get out, and, once out, of course I can 
help you." " By my beard," said the Goat, " that's a good 



.THE GENEROUS LION. 35 

plan. I should never have thought of that. How I wish 
I had your brains, to be sure!" The Fox, having got out 
in the way described, began to rail at his companion. 
" Make the most of your patience, old fellow," said he, 
"for you'll need it all. If you had had half as much 
brains as beard, you would never have gone down there. 
I am sorry that I can't stay longer with you, but I have 
some business that must be seen to. So, good-bye." 



THE GENEROUS LION. 

A LION having pulled down a Bullock, stood over it, lash 
ing his sides with his tail. A Robber who was passing by 
stopped and impudently demanded half shares. " You are 
always too ready to take what does not belong to you," 
answered the Lion ; "go your way, I have nothing to say 
to you." The Thief saw that the Lion was not to be trifled 
with, and went off. Just then a Traveller came up, and 
seeing the Lion, modestly and timorously withdrew. The 
generous beast, with a courteous, affable air, called him 
forward, and, dividing the Bullock in halves, told the man 
to take one, and in order that he might be under no 
restraint, carried his own portion away into the forest. 



;E SOPS FABLES. 



CAESAR AND THE SLAVE. 

DURING a visit that Tiberius Caesar paid to one of his 
country residences, he observed that whenever he walked in 
the grounds, a certain Slave was always a little way ahead 
of him, busily watering the paths. Turn which way he 
would, go where he might, there was the fellow still fussing 
about with his watering-pot. He felt sure that he was 
making himself thus needlessly officious in the hope of 
thereby gaining his liberty. In making a Slave free, a part 
of the ceremony consisted in giving him a gentle stroke on 
one side of the face. Hence, when the man came running 
up in eager expectation, at the call of the Emperor, the 
latter said to him, " I have for a long time observed you 
meddling where you had nothing to do, and while you 
might have been better employed elsewhere. You are 
mistaken if you think I can afford a box on the ear at so 
low a price as you bid for it." 



THE TRAVELLERS AND THE BEAR. 

Two men about to journey through a forest, agreed to stand 
by one another in any dangers that might befal. They had 
not gone far before a savage Bear rushed out from a thicket 
and stood in their path. One of the Travellers, a light, 
nimble fellow, got up into a tree. The other fell flat on his 
face and held his breath. The Bear came up and smelled 




THE TRAVELLERS AND THE BEAR. 



THE WOLF, THE Fox, AND THE APE. 39 

at him, and taking him for dead, went off again into the 
wood. The man in the tree came down, and rejoining his 
companion, asked him, with a mischievous smile, what 
was the wonderful secret that the Bear had whispered into 
his ear. " Why," replied the other sulkily, " he told me 
to take care for the future and not to put any confidence 
in such cowardly rascals as you are." 



THE SOW AND THE CAT. 

A Sow and a Cat once talking together, the conversation 
turned upon the comparative largeness of their families. " I 
have as large families, and as often, as anybody," said the 
Cat with a conceited air. " Ay, ay," grunted the Sow, " that 
may be ; but you are always in so much haste about it, that 
you bring your kittens into the world blind." 



THE WOLF, THE FOX, AND THE APE. 

THE Wolf charged the Fox, before the Ape as judge, with 
having stolen some meat which he had put by. The case 
was long and angrily contested, and the Ape, having heard 
all that was to be said on both sides, announced his 
decision as follows : " You, Master Wolf, in spite of your 
complaints, do not appear to me to have had anything to 
lose ; but I am forced to admit that you, Master Fox, have 
certainly stolen what is laid to your charge." 



4o SSOFS FABLES. 



THE BOY AND HIS MOTHER. 

A LITTLE Boy, who went to school, stole one of his 
schoolfellow's books and took it home. His Mother, so 
far from correcting him, took the book and sold it, and 
gave him an apple for his pains. In the course of time 
the Boy became a robber, and at last was tried for his 
life and condemned. He was led to the gallows, a great 
crowd of people following, and among them his Mother, 
bitterly weeping. He prayed the officers to grant him 
the favour of a few parting words with her, and his 
request was freely granted. He approached his Mother, 
put his arm round her neck, and making as though he 
would whisper something in her ear, bit it off. Her cry 
of pain drew everybody's eyes upon them, and great was 
the indignation that at such a time he should add 
another violence to his list of crimes. " Nay, good 
people," said he, " do not be deceived. My first theft 
was of a book, which I gave to my Mother. Had she 
whipped me for it, instead of praising me, I should not 
have come to the gallows now that I am a man." 




THE Fox AND THE SICK LION, 




THE FOX AND THE SICK LION. 

IT was reported that the Lion was sick and confined to his 
den, where he would be happy to see any of his subjects 
who might come to pay the homage that was due to him. 
Many accordingly went in, but it was observed that the 
Fox very carefully kept away. The Lion noticed his 
absence, and sent one of his Jackals to express a hope 
that he would show he was not insensible to motives of 
respect and charity, by coming and paying his duty like the 
rest. The Fox told the Jackal to offer his sincerest reve 
rence to his master, and to say that he had more than once 
been on the point of coming to see him, but he had in 
truth observed that all the foot-prints at the mouth of the 
cave pointed inwards, and none outwards, and not being 



42 ^ SOP'S FABLES. 



able to explain that fact to his satisfaction, he had taken the 
liberty of stopping away. The truth was that this illness of 
the Lion's was only a sham to induce the beasts to come to 
his den, that he might the more easily devour them. 



THE ASS AND THE LITTLE DOG. 

THE Ass observing how great a favourite a Little Dog 
was with his master, how much caressed and fondled, 
and fed \vith choice bits at every meal and for no other 
reason, that he could see, but skipping and frisking about 
and wagging his tail resolved to imitate him, and see 
whether the same behaviour would not bring him similar 
favours. Accordingly, the master was no sooner come 
home from walking, and seated in his easy-chair, than the 
Ass came into the room, and danced around him with many 
an awkward gambol. The man could not help laughing 
aloud at the odd sight. The joke, however, became serious 
when the Ass, rising on his hind-legs, laid his fore-feet 
upon his master's shoulders, and braying in his face in the 
most fascinating manner, would fain have jumped into his 
lap. The man cried out for help, and one of his servants 
running in with a good stick, laid it unmercifully on the 
bones of the poor Ass, who was glad to get back to his stable. 




THE EARTHEN POT AND THE POT OF BRASS. 43 



THE SHEEP-BITER. 

A CERTAIN Shepherd had a Dog in whom he placed such 
great trust, that he would often leave the flock to his sole 
care. As soon, however, as his master's back was turned, 
the Cur, although well fed and kindly treated, used to worry 
the Sheep, and would sometimes kill one and devour a 
portion. The man at last found out how much his con 
fidence had been abused, and resolved to hang the Dog 
without mercy. When the rope was put around his neck, 
he pleaded hard for his life, and begged his master rather 
to hang the Wolf, who had done ten times as much harm 
to the flock as he had. " That may be," replied the man 
sternly; " but you are ten times the greater villain for all 
that. Nothing shall save you from the fate which your 
treachery deserves." 



THE EARTHEN POT AND THE POT OF 

BRASS. 

A RIVER having overflowed its banks, two Pots were carried 
along in the stream, one made of Earthenware and the 
other of Brass. " Well, brother, since we share the same 
fate, let us go along together," cried the Brazen Pot to the 
Earthen one. " No, no !" replied the latter in a great fright; 
" keep off whatever you do, for if you knock against me, 
or I against you, it will be all over with me to the 
bottom I shall go." 



44 jEso-ps FABLES. 



THE TORTOISE AND THE EAGLE. 

A TORTOISE, weary of crawling about on the ground at 
a snail's pace, desired to fly in the air like the birds, and 
gave out that if any bird would take him up in the 
clouds and show him the world, he would tell him in 
return where to find treasures hid in the earth. The 
Eagle thereupon did as he wished, but finding that the 
Tortoise could not keep his word, carried him up once 
more, and let him fall on a hard rock, where he was dashed 
to pieces. 



THE TWO CRABS. 

" MY dear," called out an old Crab to her daughter one 
day, "why do you sidle along in that awkward manner? 
Why don't you go forward like other people?" "Well, 
mother," answered the young Crab, " it seems to me that 
I go exactly like you do. Go first and show me how, and 
I will gladly follow." 



THE FOX WITHOUT A TAIL. 

A Fox was once caught in a trap by his tail, and in order 
to get away, was forced to leave it behind. Knowing that 
without a tail he would be a laughing-stock for all his 
fellows, he resolved to try to induce them to part with 
theirs. So at the next assembly of Foxes he made a speech 




THE FOX WITHOUT A TAIL. 



THE Fox AND THE BRAMBLE. 47 

on the unprofitableness of tails in general, and the in 
convenience of a Fox's tail in particular, adding that he 
had never felt so easy as since he had given up his 
own. When he had sat down, a sly old fellow rose, and 
waving his long brush with a graceful air, said, with a 
sneer, that if, like the last speaker, he had lost his tail, 
nothing further would have been needed to convince him ; 
but till such an accident should happen, he should cer 
tainly vote in favour of tails. 



THE VIPER AND THE FILE. 

A VIPER entered a smith's shop, and looked up and 
down for something to eat. He settled at last upon a 
File, and began to gnaw it greedily. " Bite away," said 
the File gruffly, "you'll get little from me. It is my 
business to take from all and give to none." 



THE FOX AND THE BRAMBLE. 

A Fox, hotly pursued by the Hounds, jumped through a 
hedge, and his feet were sadly torn by a Bramble that grew 
in the midst. He fell to licking his paws, with many a 
curse against the Bramble for its unkind treatment. 
" Softly, softly, good words if you please, Master Rey 
nard," said the Bramble. " I thought you knew better 
than to lay hold of one whose nature it is to lay hold of 
others." 



4 8 



FABLES. 



FORTUNE AND THE BOY. 

A LITTLE Boy quite tired out with play, stretched out, 
and fell sound asleep close to the edge of a deep well. 
Fortune came by, and gently waking him said, " My dear 
Boy, believe me, I have saved your life. If you had fallen 
in, everybody would have laid the blame on me; but tell 
me truly, now, would the fault have been yours or mine?" 



THE MAN AND HIS GOOSE. 

A CERTAIN Man had a Goose that laid him a golden egg 
every day. Being of a covetous turn, he thought if he 
killed his Goose he should come at once at the source 
of his treasure. So he killed her, and cut her open, and 
great was his dismay to find that her inside was in no 
way different to that of any other Goose. 




THE BULL AND THE GOAT. 



49 




THE PEACOCK AND THE CRANE. 

THE Peacock, spreading his gorgeous tail, stalked up and 
down in his most stately manner before a Crane, and 
ridiculed him for the plainness of his plumage. " Tut, 
tut!" said the Crane; " which is the better now, to strut 
about in the dirt, and be gazed at by children, or to soar 
above the clouds, as I do?' 



THE BULL AND THE GOAT. 

A BULL being pursued by a Lion, spied a cave, and flew 
towards it, meaning to take shelter there. A Goat came 
to the mouth of the cave, and menacing the Bull with 
his horns, disputed the passage. The Bull, having no 



50 ^Esop's FABLES. 



time to lose, was obliged to make off again without 
delay, but not before saying to the Goat, " Were it not 
for the Lion that is behind me, I would soon let you 
know the difference between a Bull and a Goat." 



A MAN BITTEN BY A DOG. 

A MAN who had been sadly bitten by a Dog, was advised 
by an old woman as a cure to rub a piece of bread on the 
wound, and give it to the Dog that had bitten him. He 
did so, and ^Esop, passing by at the time, asked him 
what he was about. The Man told him, and yEsop 
replied, " I am glad you do it privately, for if the rest 
of the Dogs of the town were to see you, we should be 
eaten up alive." 



THE STAG AND THE FAWN. 

A FAWN once said to a Stag, " How is it that you, who 
are so much bigger, and stronger, and fleeter than a Dog, 
are in such a fright when you behold one ? If you stood 
your ground, and used your horns, I should think the 
Hounds would fly from you." " I have said that to myself, 
little one, over and over again," replied the Stag, " and 
made up my mind to act upon it ; but yet, no sooner do 
I hear the voice of a Dog than I am ready to jump out of 
my skin." 



THE Fox AND THE MASK. 51 



AN Ass and a Cock feeding in the same meadow, were 
one day surprised by a Lion. The Cock crowed loudly, 
and the Lion (who is said to have a great antipathy to the 
crowing of a Cock) at once turned tail and ran off again. 
The Ass, believing that it was from fear of him that the 
Lion fled, pursued him. As soon as they were out of 
hearing of the Cock, the Lion turned round upon the Ass 
and tore him in pieces. 



THE FOX AND THE MASK. 

A Fox was one day rummaging in the house of an actor, 
and came across a very beautiful Mask. Putting his paw 
on the forehead, he said, "What a handsome, face we 
have here! Pity it is that it should want brains." 







52 ALSO PS FABLES. 



DEATH AND CUPID. 

CUPID, one sultry summer's noon, tired with play and faint 
with heat, went into a cool grotto to repose himself. This 
happened to be the cave of Death. He threw himself care 
lessly down upon the floor, and his quiver turning upside 
down, all the arrows fell out, and mingled with those of 
Death, which lay scattered about the place. When he 
awoke, he gathered them up as well as he could ; but they 
were so intermingled, that although he knew the proper 
number to take, he could not rightly distinguish his own. 
Hence he took up some of the arrows which belonged to 
Death, and left some of his. This is the cause that we now 
and then see the hearts of the old and decrepit transfixed 
with the bolts of Love ; and with great grief and surprise, 
sometimes see youth and beauty smitten with the darts 
of Death. 



THE LION, THE TIGER, AND THE FOX. 

A LION and a Tiger happened to come together over the 
dead body of a Fawn that had been recently shot. A fierce 
battle ensued, and as each animal was in the prime of his 
age and strength, the combat was long and furious. At 
last they lay stretched on the ground panting, bleeding, and 
exhausted, each unable to lift a paw against the other. An 
impudent Fox coming by at the time, stepped in and carried 
off before their eyes the prey on account of which they had 
both suffered so much. 




THE LION, THE TIGER, AND THE FOX. 



THE HARPER. 55 



THE WOOD AND THE CLOWN. 

A COUNTRYMAN entered a Wood and looked about him 
as though he were in search of something. The Trees, 
moved by curiosity, asked him what it was he wanted. 
He answered that all he wanted was a piece of good, 
tough ash for a handle to his axe. The Trees agreed 
that if that was all, he should have it. When, however, 
he had got it, and fitted it to his axe, he laid about him 
unmercifully, and the giants of the forest fell under his 
strokes. The Oak is said to have spoken thus to the 
Beech, in a low whisper : " Brother, we must take it for 
our pains." 



THE HARPER. 

A MAN who used to play upon his Harp, and sing to it, 
in wine-shops and other small places of entertainment, 
was led by the applause which his efforts met with there 
to desire a larger sphere in which to display his talents. 
He fancied if he could only be once allowed to play and 
sing upon the stage of the public theatre, renown and 
fortune must assuredly follow. He tried long and hard, 
and at last gained the necessary permission, but in such 
a vast place, his strains seemed so weak, thin, and 
wretched that he was unanimously hissed off the stage. 



56 ^ SOP'S FABLES. 



THE RIVER FISH AND THE SEA FISH. 

A LARGE overgrown Pike was carried out to sea by a 
strong current. He gave himself great airs on account of 
what he considered his superior race and descent, and 
despised the Sea Fishes among whom he found himself. 
" You value yourself at a great price/' said a little stranger, 
" but if ever it is our fate to come to the market, you 
will find that I am thought a good deal more of there 
than you." 



THE HORSE AND THE STAG. 

THE Horse having quarrelled with the Stag, and being 
unable to revenge himself upon his enemy, came to a Man 
and begged his help. He allowed the Man to saddle 
and bridle him, and together they ran down the Stag 
and killed him. The Horse neighed with joy, and, 
thanking his rider warmly, asked him now to remove his 
saddle and let him go. "No, no," said the Man; "you 
are much too useful to me as you are." The Horse 
thenceforward served the Man, and found that he had 
gratified his revenge at the cost of his liberty, 




THE THUNNY AND THE DOLPHIN. 



57 




THE VAIN JACKDAW. 

A JACKDAW having dressed himself in feathers which 
had fallen from some Peacocks, strutted about in the 
company of these birds, and tried to pass himself off as 
one of them. They soon found him out, and pulled 
their feathers from him so roughly, and in other ways 
so battered him, that when he would have rejoined his 
fellows, they, in their turn, would have nothing to do 
with him, and drove him from their society. 



THE THUNNY AND THE DOLPHIN. 

A THUNNY being pursued by a Dolphin, swam for safety 
into shallow water. Seeing the Dolphin still after him, 
he came further in shore, and was thrown by the waves 



58 sEsops FABLES. 



high and dry on the sand. The Dolphin,. -eager in pursuit, 
and unable to stop himself, was also stranded. The 
Thunny beholding the Dolphin in the same condition as 
himself, said, " Now I die with pleasure, for I see my 
persecutor involved in the same fate." 



THE PARTRIDGE AND THE COCKS. 

A CERTAIN man having taken a Partridge, cut his wings 
and put him into a little yard where he kept Game-Cocks. 
The Cocks were not at all civil to the new-comer, who 
at first put his treatment down to the fact of his being 
a stranger. When, however, he found that they frequently 
fought and nearly killed each other, he ceased to wonder 
that they did not respect him. 



THE HUNTED BEAVER. 

THE tail of the Beaver was once thought to be of use 
in medicine, and the animal was often hunted on that 
account. A shrewd old fellow of the race, being hard 
pressed by the Dogs, and knowing well why they were 
after him, had the resolution and the presence of mind 
to bite off his tail, and leave it behind him, and thus 
escaped with his life. 



THE Fox AND THE TIGER. 



59 



THE OAK AND THE REEDS. 

A VIOLENT storm uprooted an Oak that grew on the 
bank of a river. The Oak drifted across the stream, 
and lodged among some Reeds. Wondering to find these 
still standing, he could not help asking them how it was 
they had escaped the fury of a storm which had torn 
him up by the roots. " We bent our heads to the 
blast," said they, "and it passed over us. You stood 
stiff and stubborn till you could stand no longer." 



THE FOX AND THE TIGER. 

A SKILFUL archer coming into the woods, directed his 
arrows so well that the beasts fled in dismay. The Tiger, 
however, told them not to be afraid, for he would singly 
engage their enemy, and drive him from their domain. 
He had scarcely spoken, when an arrow pierced his ribs 
and lodged in his side. The Fox asked him, slyly, what 
he thought of his opponent now. " Ah ! " replied the 
Tiger, writhing with pain, " I find that I was mistaken in 
my reckoning." 




60 sEsops FABLES. 



.ESOP AT PLAY. 

AN Athenian once found /Esop joining merrily in the 
sports of some children. He ridiculed him for his want 
of gravity, and yEsop good-temperedly took up a bow, 
unstrung it, and laid it at his feet. " There, friend," said 
he ; " that bow, if kept always strained, would lose its 
spring, and probably snap. Let it go free sometimes, and 
it will be the fitter for use when it is wanted. " 



THE FOX AND THE COUNTRYMAN. 

A Fox having been hunted hard, and run a long chase, 
saw a Countryman at work in a wood, and begged him 
to help him to some hiding-place. The man said he 
might go into his cottage, which was close by. He w r as 
no sooner in, than the Huntsmen came up. " Have you 
seen a Fox pass this way ?" said they. The Countryman 
said " No,'' but pointed at the same time towards the place 
where the Fox lay. The Huntsmen did not take the hint, 
however, and made off again at full speed. The Fox, who 
had seen all that took place through a chink in the wall, 
thereupon came out, and was walking away without a word. 
" Why, how now ? " said the man ; " haven't you the 
manners to thank your host before you go ? " " Yes, yes," 
said the Fox ; " if you had been as honest with your finger 
as you were with your tongue, I shouldn't have gone with 
out saying good-bye." 




THE FOX AND THE COUNTRYMAN. 



THE THIEF AND THE BOY. 



THE ONE-EYED DOE. 

A DOE that had but one eye, used to graze near the sea, 
so that she might keep her blind eye towards the water, 
while she surveyed the country and saw that no hunters 
came near, with the other. It happened, however, that 
some men in a boat saw her, and as she did not perceive 
their approach, they came very close, and one who had 
a gun, fired and shot her. In her dying agony she cried 
out, " Alas, hard fate ! that I should receive my death- 
wound from the side whence I expected no ill, and be safe 
on that where I looked for most danger." 



THE THIEF AND THE BOY. 

A BOY sat weeping upon the side of a well. A Thief 
happening to come by just at the same time, asked him 
why he wept. The Boy, sighing and sobbing, showed a 
bit of cord, and said that a silver tankard had come off 
from it, and was now at the bottom of the well. The 
Thief pulled off his clothes and went down into the well, 
meaning to keep the tankard for himself. Having groped 
about for some time without finding it, he came up 
again, and found not only the Boy gone, but his own 
clothes also, the dissembling rogue having made off with 
them. 



6 4 



y 'SOP'S FABLES. 



THE ASS, THE DOG, AND THE WOLF. 

A LADEN Ass was jogging along, followed by his tired 
master, at whose heels came a hungry Dog. Their path 
lay across a meadow, and the man stretched himself out on 
the turf and went to sleep. The Ass fed on the pasture, 
and was in no hurry at all to move. The Dog alone, being 
gnawed by the pains of hunger, found the time pass 
heavily. " Pray, dear companion," said he to the Ass, 
" stoop, that I may take my dinner from the pannier." The 
Ass turned a deaf ear, and went on cropping away the 
green and tender grass. The Dog persisted, and at last the 
Ass replied, " Wait, can't you, till our master wakes. He 
will give you your usual portion, without fail." Just then a 
famished Wolf appeared upon the scene, and sprang at the 
throat of the Ass. " Help, help, dear Towzer 1" cried the 
Ass ; but the Dog would not budge. " Wait till our 
master wakes/' said he ; " he will come to your help, 
without fail." The words were no sooner spoken, than the 
Ass lay strangled upon the sod. 




7 HE FOX AND THE APE. 




THE FOX AND THE APE. 

UPON the decease of the Lion, the beasts of the forest 
assembled to choose another king. The Ape played so 
many grimaces, gambols, and antic tricks, that he was 
elected by a large majority, and the crown was placed upon 
his head. The Fox, envious of this distinction, seeing soon 
after a trap baited with a piece of meat, approached the 
new king, and said with mock humility, " May it please 
your majesty, I have found on your domain a treasure 
to which, if you will deign to accompany me, I will 
conduct you." The Ape thereupon set off with the Fox, 
and on arriving at the spot, laid his paw upon the meat. 
Snap! went the trap, and caught him by the fingers. Mad 



66 ALSOPS FABLES. 



with the shame and the pain, he reproached the Fox for 
a false thief and a traitor. Reynard laughed heartily, and 
going off, said over his shoulder, with a sneer, " You a 
king, and not understand a trap!" 



THE POWER OF FABLES. 

DEMADES, a famous Greek orator, was once addressing 
an assembly at Athens on a subject of great importance, 
and in vain tried to fix the attention of his hearers. 
They laughed among themselves, watched the sports of 
the children, and in twenty other ways showed their want 
of concern in the subject of the discourse. Demades, 
after a short pause, spoke as follows : " Ceres one day 
journeyed in company with a Swallow and an Eel." 
At this there was marked attention, and every ear strained 
now to catch the words of the orator. " The party came 
to a river," continued he. "The Eel swam across, and 
the Swallow flew over." He then resumed the subject of 
his harangue. A great cry, however, arose from the 
people. "And Ceres? and Ceres?" cried they. "What 
did Ceres do?" "Why, the goddess was, and indeed she 
is now," replied he, " mightily offended that people should 
have their ears open to any sort of foolery, and shut to 
words of truth and wisdom." 



THE DOVE AND THE ANT. 67 



THE GOATHERD AND THE GOATS. 

DURING a snowstorm in the depth of winter, a Goatherd 
drove his Goats for shelter to a large cavern in a rock. It 
happened that some Wild Goats had already taken refuge 
there. The Man was so struck by the size and look of 
these Goats, and with their superior beauty to his own, that 
he gave to them alone all the food he could collect. The 
storm lasted many days, and the Tame Goats, being entirely 
without food, died of starvation. As soon as the sun 
shone again, the strangers ran off, and made the best of 
their way to their native wilds. The Goatherd had to go 
goatless home, and was well laughed at by all for his folly. 



THE DOVE AND THE ANT. 

AN Ant going to a river to drink, fell in, and was carried 
along in the stream. A Dove pitied her condition, and 
threw into the river a small bough, by means of which the 
Ant gained the shore. The Ant afterwards, seeing a man 
with a fowling-piece aiming at the Dove, stung him in the 
foot sharply, and made him miss his aim, and so saved the 
Dove's life. 



68 sEsop's FABLES. 



THE MICE IN COUNCIL. 

A CERTAIN Cat that lived in a large country-house was so 
vigilant and active, that the Mice, finding their numbers 
grievously thinned, held a council, with closed doors, to 
consider what they had best do. Many plans had been 
started and dismissed, when a young Mouse, rising and 
catching the eye of the president, said that he had a 
proposal to make, that he was sure must meet with the 
approval of all. " If," said he, " the Cat wore around her 
neck a little bell, every step she took would make it tinkle ; 
then, ever forewarned of her approach, we should have time 
to reach our holes. By this simple means we should live in 
safety, and defy her power." The speaker resumed his seat 
with a complacent air, and a murmur of applause arose 
from the audience. An old grey Mouse, with a merry 
twinkle in his eye, now got up, and said that the plan of 
the last speaker was an admirable one ; but he feared it 
had one drawback. He had not told them who should put 
the bell around the Cat's neck. 



THE MOUNTAIN IN LABOUR, 

A MOUNTAIN from which were heard to proceed dreadful 
groans was said to be in labour, and people flocked near to 
see what would be produced. After waiting till they were 
quite tired, out crept a Mouse. 




THE MOUNTAIN IN LABOUR. 



THE MOUSE AND THE WEASEL. 71 



THE CREAKING WHEEL. 

A COACHMAN hearing one of the Wheels of his coach make 
a great noise, and perceiving that it was the worst one of 
the four, asked it how it came to take such a liberty. The 
Wheel answered that from the beginning of time creak 
ing had always been the privilege of the weak. 



THE MOUSE AND THE WEASEL. 

A LEAN and hungry Mouse once pushed his way, not 
without some trouble, through a small hole into a corn- 
hutch, and there fed for some time so busily, that when 
he would have returned by the same way that he entered, 
he found himself too plump to get through the hole, push 
as hard as he might. A Weasel, who had great fun in 
watching the vain struggles of the fat little thing, called 
to him, and said, " Listen to me, my plump friend. 
There is but one way to get out, and that is to wait till 
you have become as lean as when you first got in." 




72 ^ SOP'S FABLES. 



THE OLD MAN AND HIS SONS. 

AN Old Man had many Sons, who were always falling out 
with one another. He had often, but to no purpose, 
exhorted them to live together in harmony. One day he 
called them round him, and producing a bundle of sticks, 
bade them try each in turn to break it across. Each put 
forth all his strength, but the bundle resisted all their 
efforts. Then, cutting the cord which bound the sticks 
together, he told his Sons to break them separately. This 
was done with the greatest ease. " See, my Sons/' 
exclaimed he, "the power of unity ! Bound together by 
brotherly love, you may defy almost every mortal ill ; 
divided, you will fall a prey to your enemies." 



THE OLD WOMAN AND HER MAIDS. 

A CERTAIN Old Woman had several Maids, whom she 
used to call to their work every morning at the crowing 
of the Cock. The Maids, finding it grievous to have their 
sweet sleep disturbed so early, killed the Cock, thinking 
when he was quiet they should enjoy their warm beds a 
little longer. The Old Woman, vexed at the loss of her 
Cock, and suspecting them to be concerned in it, from 
that time made them rise soon after midnight. 



THE CAT AND THE COCK. 



73 




THE DOG IN THE MANGER. 

A DOG was lying in a Manger full of hay. An Ox, being 
hungry, came near and was going to eat of the hay. The 
Dog, getting up and snarling at him, would not let him 
touch it. "Surly creature," said the Ox, "you cannot eat 
the hay yourself, and yet you will let no one else have any." 



THE CAT AND THE COCK. 

A CAT one day caught a Cock, and resolved to make a 
meal of him. He first asked him, however, what defence 
he had to make. " What reason can you give," said he, 



74 



FABLES. 



" for your screaming at night so ? No honest body can 
sleep for you." " Nay," answered the Cock, " I only crow 
in the service of man, to tell him when it is time to com 
mence his labours/' "What nonsense you talk!" said the 
Cat; "you are mistaken if you think that such an excuse 
as that will do me out of my breakfast." 



THE HORSE AND THE ASS. 

A WAR-HORSE, gaily caparisoned, with arching neck and 
lofty tread, the ground ringing beneath his hoofs, overtook 
a patient Ass, slowly walking along under a heavy load. 
He called upon him in a haughty tone to move on one 
side, and give him room to pass. The poor Ass did so, 
sighing at the inequality of their lots. Not long after, he 
met the same Horse in the same road, and near the same 
spot ; but in how different circumstances ! Wounded in 
battle, and his master killed, he was now lame, half blind, 
and heavily laden, driven with many blows by a brutal 
carrier, into whose hands he had fallen. 



THE BIRDS, THE BEASTS, AND THE BAT. 75 



HERCULES AND THE WAGONER. 

As a Wagoner was driving his wain through a miry 
lane, the wheels stuck fast in the clay, and the Horses 
could get on no further. The Man dropped on his knees, 
and began crying and praying to Hercules with all his 
might to come and help him. "Lazy fellow!" said 
Hercules, "get up and stir yourself. Whip your Horses 
stoutly, and put your shoulder to the wheel. If you want 
my help then, you shall have it." 



THE BIRDS, THE BEASTS, AND THE BAT. 

ONCE upon a time a fierce war was waged between the 
Birds and the Beasts. The Bat at first fought on the side 
of the Birds, but later on in the day the tide of battle ran 
so much in favour of the Beasts, that he changed over, and 
fought on the other side. Owing mainly, however, to the 
admirable conduct and courage of the Eagle, the tide once 
more and finally turned in favour of the Birds. The Bat, 
to save his life and escape the shame of falling into the 
hands of his deserted friends, fled, and has ever since 
skulked in caves and hollow trees, coming out only in the 
dusk, when the Birds are gone to roost. 



76 s SOP'S FAHLES. 



THE GEESE AND THE CRANES. 

A PARTY of Geese and a party of Cranes were discovered 
by the farmer eating his young corn, then just appearing 
above the ground. The Cranes, being light of wing, fle\v 
off, and all the weight of the punishment fell upon the 
Geese. 



THE FROGS DESIRING A KING. 

THE Frogs living an easy, free sort of life among the 
lakes and ponds, once prayed Jupiter to send them a 
King. Jove being at that time in a merry mood, threw 
them a Log, saying, as he did so, " There, then, is a 
King for you." Awed by the splash, the Frogs watched 
their King in fear and trembling, till at last, encouraged 
by his stillness, one more daring than the rest jumped 
upon the shoulder of his monarch. Soon, many others 
followed his example, and made merry on the back of their 
unresisting King. Speedily tiring of such a torpid ruler, 
they again petitioned Jupiter, and asked him to send 
them something more like a King. This time he sent 
them a Stork, who tossed them about and gobbled them 
up without mercy. They lost no time, therefore, in 
beseeching the god to give them again their former state. 
" No, no," replied he; "a King that did you no harm did 
not please you. Make the best of the one you have, or 
you may chance to get a worse in his place." 







THE FROGS DESIRIXG A KING. 



THE Two RABBITS. 79 



THE TWO RABBITS. 

A RABBIT, who was about to have a family, entreated another 
Rabbit to lend her her hutch until she was able to move 
about again, and assured her that she should then have it 
without fail. The other very readily consented, and, with 
a great deal of civility, resigned it to her immediately. 
However, when the time was up, she came and paid her 
a visit, and very modestly intimated that now she was up 
and well she hoped she might have her hutch again, for 
it was really inconvenient for her to be without it any 
longer ; she must, therefore, be so free as to desire her 
to provide herself with other lodgings as soon as she could. 
The other replied that truly she was ashamed of having 
kept her so long out of her own house, but it was not upon 
her own account (for, indeed, she was well enough to go 
anywhere) so much as that of her young, who were yet 
so weak that she was afraid they would not be able to 
follow her; and if she would be so good as to let her 
stay a fortnight longer she should take it for the greatest 
obligation in the world. The second Rabbit was so good- 
natured and compassionate as to comply with this request 
too, but at the end of the term came and told her positively 
that she must turn out, for she could not possibly let her 
be there a day longer. " Must turn out ! " says the other ; 
" we will see about that ; for I promise you, unless you can 
beat me and my whole litter of young, you are never likely 
to have anything more to do here." 



8o 



sE SOP'S FABLES. 



THE HUSBANDMAN AND HIS SONS. 

A CERTAIN Husbandman, lying at the point of death, called 
his Sons around him, and gave into their charge his fields 
and vineyards, telling them that a treasure lay hidden some 
where in them, within a foot from the ground. His Sons 
thought he spoke of money which he had hidden, and 
after he was buried, they dug most industriously all over 
the estate, but found nothing. The soil being so well 
loosened, however, the succeeding crops were of unequalled 
richness, and the Sons then found out what their Father 
had in view in telling them to dig for hidden treasure. 




THE ENVIOUS MAN AND THE COVETOUS. 



Si 




THE BOAR AND THE ASS. 

A LITTLE scamp of an Ass meeting in a forest with a 
Boar, came up to him and hailed him with impudent 
familiarity. The Boar was about to resent the insult by 
ripping up the Ass's flank, but, wisely stifling his 
passion, he contented himself with saying, " Go, you 
sorry beast ; I could easily and amply be revenged upon 
you, but I do not care to foul my tusks with the blood 
of so base a creature." 



THE ENVIOUS MAN AND THE COVETOUS. 

Two Men, one a Covetous fellow, and the other thoroughly 
possessed by the passion of envy, came together to proffer 



82 sE SOP'S FABLES. 



their petitions to Jupiter. The god sent Apollo to deal 
with their requests. Apollo told them that whatsoever 
should be granted to the first who asked, the other should 
receive double. The Covetous Man forbore to speak, wait 
ing in order that he might receive twice as much as his 
companion. The Envious Man, in the spitefulness of his 
heart, thereupon prayed that one of his own eyes might be 
put out, knowing that the other would have to lose both 
of his. 



THE PORCUPINE AND THE SNAKES. 

A PORCUPINE, seeking for shelter, desired some Snakes to 
give him admittance into their cave. They accordingly 
let him in, but were afterwards so annoyed by his sharp, 
prickly quills, that they repented of their easy compliance, 
and entreated him to withdraw and leave them their hole 
to themselves. " No," said he, " let them quit the place 
that don't like it; for my part, I am very well satisfied 
as I am." 




THE MOLE AND HER DAM. 83 



THE MULE. 

A MULE, well fed and worked but little, frisked and 
gambolled about in the fields, and said to himself, " What 
strength, what spirits are mine ! My father must surely 
have been a thoroughbred Horse." He soon after fell into 
the hands of another master, and was worked hard and 
but scantily fed. Thoroughly jaded, he now said, "What 
could I have been thinking about the other day? I feel 
certain now that my father can only have been an Ass." 



THE MOLE AND HER DAM. 

THE young Mole snuffed up her nose, and told her Dam 
she smelt an odd kind of a smell. By-and-by, " Oh, 
mother," said she, "what a noise there is in my ears, as 
if ten thousand paper-mills were going!" And then again, 
soon after, " Look, look, mother ! what is that I see 
yonder? It is just like the flame of a fiery furnace." 
The Dam replied, " Prithee, child, hold your idle tongue ; 
and if you would have us allow you any sense at all, do 
not pretend to more than Nature has given to you." 



84 sEsop's FABLES. 



THE FALCONER AND THE PARTRIDGE. 

A PARTRIDGE, being taken in the net of a Falconer, begged 
hard of the Man to be set free, and promised if he were let 
go to decoy other Partridges into the net. " No," replied 
the Falconer ; " I did not mean to spare you ; but, if I 
had, your words would now have condemned you. The 
scoundrel who, to save himself, offers to betray his friends, 
deserves worse than death." 



THE EAGLE AND THE FOX. 

AN Eagle, looking around for something to feed her 
young ones with, spied a Fox's cub basking in the sun. 
She swooped upon him, and was about to carry him off, 
when the old Fox came up, and, with tears in her eyes, 
implored the Eagle, by the love which she, as a mother, 
felt for her own young, to spare this, her only child. 
The Eagle, whose nest was in a very high tree, made 
light of the Fox's prayers, and carried the cub to her 
brood. She was about to divide it among them, when 
the Fox, bent upon revenge, ran to an altar in a neigh 
bouring field on which some country people had been 
sacrificing a kid, and seizing thence a flaming brand, 
made towards the tree, meaning to set it on fire. The 
Eagle, terrified at the approaching ruin of her family, was 
glad to give back the cub, safe and sound, to his mother. 




THE EAGLE AND THE FOX. 



THE HAWK AND THE FARMER. 87 



JUPITER AND THE ASS. 

A CERTAIN Ass that belonged to a gardener, was weary 
of carrying heavy burdens, and prayed to Jupiter to give 
him a new master. Jupiter granted his prayer, and gave 
him for a master a tile-maker, who made him carry 
heavier burdens than before. Again he came to Jupiter, 
and besought him to grant him a milder master, or at 
any rate, a different one. The god, laughing at his folly, 
thereupon made him over to a tanner. The Ass was 
worked harder than ever, and soon upbraided himself for 
his stupidity. " Now," said he, "I have a master who 
not only beats me living, but who will not spare my 
hide even when I am dead." 



THE HAWK AND THE FARMER. 

A HAWK pursuing a Pigeon with great eagerness, was 
caught in a net which had been set in a corn-field for the 
Crows. The Farmer, seeing the Hawk fluttering in the 
net, came and took him. The Hawk besought the Man to 
let him go, saying piteously that he had done him no harm. 
" And pray what harm had the poor Pigeon you followed 
done to you ? " replied the Farmer. Without more ado he 
wrung off his head. 



FABLES. 



THE SWALLOW AND OTHER BIRDS. 

A FARMER, sowing his fields with flax, was observed by 
a Swallow, who, like the rest of her tribe, had travelled a 
good deal, and was very clever. Among other things, she 
knew that of this same flax, when it grew up, nets and 
snares would be made, to entrap her little friends, the Birds 
of the country. Hence, she earnestly besought them to 
help her in picking up and eating the hateful seed, before it 
had time to spring from the ground. Food of a much nicer 
kind was, however, then so plentiful, and it was so pleasant 
to fly about and sing, thinking of nothing, that they paid 
no attention to her entreaties. By and by the blades of the 
flax appeared above the ground, and the anxiety of the 
Swallow was renewed. " It is not yet too late," said she ; 
"pull it all up, blade by blade, and you may then escape 
the fate which is otherwise in store for you. You cannot, 
like me, fly to other countries when danger threatens you 
here." The little Birds, however, still took no notice of 
the Swallow, except to consider her a very troublesome 
person, whom silly fears had set beside herself. In the 
course of time the flax grew, ripened, and was gathered, 
spun, and made up into nets, as the Swallow had foretold. 
Many a little Bird thought, in dying, of the Swallow they 
held to be so crazy. The Swallow, in despair at their 
thoughtless behaviour, has since preferred the society of 
men to that of her feathered companions. 



THE LARK AND HER YOUNG ONES. 



89 




THE LARK AND HER YOUNG ONES. 

A LARK, who had Young Ones in a field of corn which was 
almost ripe, was afraid lest the reapers should come before 
her young brood were fledged. Every day, therefore, when 
she flew away to look for food, she charged them to take 
notice of what they heard in her absence, and to tell her of 
it when she returned, One day when she was gone, they 
heard the master of the field say to his son that the corn 
seemed ripe enough to be cut, and tell him to go early to 
morrow and desire their friends and neighbours to come 
and help to reap it. When the old Lark came home, the 
Little Ones fell quivering and chirping around her, and 
told her what had happened, begging her to remove them 
as fast as she could. The mother bade them to be easy, 



12 



go s SOP'S FABLES. 



lt tor/' said she, " if he depends upon his friends and his 
neighbours, I am sure the corn will not be reaped to 
morrow." Next day she went out again, and left the same 
orders as before. The owner .came, and waited. The sun 
grew hot, but nothing was done, for not a soul came. " You 
see," said he to his son, " these friends of ours are not to 
be depended upon, so run off at once to your uncles and 
cousins, and say I wish them to come betimes to-morrow 
morning and help us to reap." This the Young Ones, in a 
great fright, reported also to their mother. " Do not be 
frightened, children/' said she ; " kindred and relations are 
not always very forward in helping one another ; but keep 
your ears open, and let me know what you hear to-morrow." 
The owner came the next day, and, finding his relations 
as backward as his neighbours, said to his son, " Now, 
George, listen to me. Get a couple of good sickles ready 
against to-morrow morning, for it seems we must reap the 
corn by ourselves." The Young Ones told this to their 
mother. " Then, my dears," said she, " it is time for us to 
go indeed, for when a man undertakes to do his business 
himself, it is not so likely that he will be disappointed." 
She removed her Young Ones immediately, and the corn 
was reaped the next day by the old man and his son. 



THE GOATHERD AND THE SHE-GOAT. 



THE GOATHERD AND THE SHE-GOAT. 

A BOY, whose business it was to look after some Goats, as 
night began to fall, gathered them together to lead them 
home. One of the number, a She-Goat, alone refused to 
obey his call, and stood on a ledge of a rock, nibbling the 
herbage that grew there. The Boy lost all patience, and 
taking up a great stone, threw it at the Goat with all his 
force. The stone struck one of the horns of the Goat, and 
broke it off at the middle. The Boy, terrified at what he 
had done and fearing his master's anger, threw himself 
upon his knees before the Goat, and begged her to say 
nothing about the mishap, alleging that it was far from his 
intention to aim the stone so well. " Tush ! " replied the 
Goat. " Let my tongue be ever so silent, my horn is sure 
to tell the tale." 




92 



MERCURY AND THE WOODMAN. 

A MAN felling a. tree on the bank of a river, by chance 
let his axe slip from his hand. It dropped into the water, 
and sank to the bottom. In great distress at the loss of 
his tool, he sat down on the bank and grieved bitterly. 
Mercury appeared, and asked him what was the matter. 
Having heard the Man's story, he dived to the bottom of 
the river, and bringing up a golden axe, offered it to him. 
The Woodman refused to take it, saying it was not his. 
Mercury then dived a second time, and brought up a silver 
one. This also the Man refused, saying that that, too, was 
none of his. He dived a third time, and brought up the 
axe that the Man had lost. This the poor Man took with 
great joy and thankfulness. Mercury was so pleased with 
his honesty, that he gave him the other two into the 
bargain. The Woodman told this adventure to his mates, 
and one of them at once set off for the river, and let his axe 
fall in on purpose. He then began to lament his loss with 
a loud voice. Mercury appeared, as before, and demanded 
the cause of his grief. After hearing the Man's account, he 
dived and brought up a golden axe, and asked him if that 
was his. Transported at the sight of the precious metal, 
the fellow eagerly answered that it was, and greedily 
attempted to snatch it. The god, detecting his falsehood 
and impudence, not only declined to give it to him, but 
refused to let him have his own again. 




MERCURY AND THE WOODMAN. 



THE OXEN AND THE BUTCHERS. 95 



THE LION AND THE FROG. 

THE Lion hearing an odd kind of a hollow voice, and 
seeing nobody, started up. He listened again ; the voice 
continued, and he shook with fear. At last seeing a Frog 
crawl out of the lake, and finding that the noise proceeded 
from that little creature, he spurned it to pieces with his 
feet. 



THE OXEN AND THE BUTCHERS. 

ONCE upon a time the Oxen took counsel together, and 
resolved upon ridding the land of all the Butchers, who so 
constantly led away the finest and fattest of their number 
to perish by the axe and knife. They were on the point 
of proceeding to carry out their plan, when a wise old Ox 
prayed them to reconsider their intentions. " You may be 
certain/' said he, " that men will not go without beef. If 
then we kill the Butchers, who are already expert in their 
trade, and who put us out of pain as quickly as possible, we 
shall be hacked and hewed by others, who have yet to learn 
the business " This sensible reasoning prevailed, and the 
plan dropped to the ground. 



96 sE SOPS FABLES. 



THE SHEPHERD BOY AND THE WOLF. 

A MISCHIEVOUS Lad, who was set to mind some Sheep, 
used, in jest, to cry "The Wolf! the Wolf!'' When the 
people at work in the neighbouring fields came running to 
the spot, he would laugh at them for their pains. One day 
the Wolf came in reality, and the Boy, this time, called 
"The Wolf! the Wolf!" in earnest; but the men, having 
been so often deceived, disregarded his cries, and the Sheep 
were left at the mercy of the Wolf. 



THE SERPENT AND THE MAN. 

THE Child of a Cottager was at play in a field at the back 
of his Father's house, and by chance trod upon a Snake, 
which turned round and bit him. The Child died of the 
bite, and the Father, pursuing the Snake, aimed a blow at 
him, and cut off a piece of his tail. The Snake gained his 
hole, and the next day the Man came and laid at the mouth 
of the hole some honey, meal, and salt, and made offers of 
peace, thinking to entice the Snake forth and kill him. " It 
won't do," hissed out the Snake. " As long as I miss 
my tail, and you your Child, there can be no good-will 
between us." 



THE TOWN MOUSE AND THE COUNTRY MOUSE. 97 




THE TOWN MOUSE AND THE COUNTRY 

MOUSE. 

A COUNTRY MOUSE, a plain, sensible sort of fellow, was 
once visited by a former companion of his, who lived in a 
neighbouring city. The Country Mouse put before his 
friend some fine peas, some choice bacon, and a bit of rare 
old Stilton, and called upon him to eat heartily of the good 
cheer. The City Mouse nibbled a little here and there in a 
dainty manner, wondering at the pleasure his host took in 
such coarse and ordinary fare. In their after-dinner chat 
the Town Mouse said to the Country Mouse, " Really, my 
good friend, that you can keep in such spirits in this dismal, 
dead-and-alive kind of place, surprises me altogether. You 
see here no life, no gaiety, no society in short, but go on 



98 /ESOPS FABLES. 



and on, in a dull humdrum sort of way, from one year's end 
to another. Come now, with me, this very night, and see 
with your own eyes what a life I lead." The Country Mouse 
consented, and as soon as it fell dark, off they started for the 
city, where they arrived just as a splendid supper given by 
the master of the house where our town friend lived was over 
and the guests had departed. The City Mouse soon got 
together a heap of dainties on a corner of the handsome 
Turkey carpet. The Country Mouse, who had never even 
heard the names of half the meats set before him, was 
hesitating where he should begin, when the room-door 
creaked, opened, and in entered a servant with a light. The 
companions ran off, but everything soon being quiet again, 
they returned to their repast, when once more the door 
opened, and the son of the master of the house came in 
\vith a great bounce, followed by his little Terrier, who 
ran sniffing to the very spot where our friends had just 
been. The City Mouse was by that time safe in his hole 
which, by the way, he had not been thoughtful enough 
to show to his friend, who could find no better shelter than 
that afforded by a sofa, behind which he waited in fear 
and trembling till quietness was again restored. The City 
Mouse then called upon him to resume his supper, but the 
Country Mouse said, "No, no ; I shall be off as fast as I 
can. I would rather have a crust with peace and quietness, 
than all your fine things in the midst of such alarms and 
frights as these." 




THE PEACOCK AND THE MAGPIE. 99 



THE PEACOCK AND THE MAGPIE. 

THE birds once met together to choose a king, and among 
others the Peacock was a candidate. Spreading his showy 
tail, and stalking up and down with affected grandeur, he 
caught the eyes of the silly multitude by his brilliant 
appearance, and was elected with acclamation. Just as they 
were going to proclaim him, the Magpie stept forth into 
the midst of the assembly, and thus addressed the new 
king : " May it please your majesty elect to permit a humble 
admirer to propose a question. As our king, we put our 
lives and fortunes in your hands. If, therefore, the Eagle, 
the Vulture, and the Kite, our unruly brethren, should in 
the future, as they have in times past, make a descent upon 
us, what means would you take for our defence ?" This 
pithy question opened the eyes of the birds to the weakness 
of their choice. They cancelled the election, and have ever 
since regarded the Peacock as a vain pretender, and con 
sidered the Magpie to be as good a speaker as any of their 
number. 




ioo sE SOP'S FABLES. 



THE SOW AND THE WOLF. 

A Sow had just farrowed, and lay in the sty with her whole 
litter of pigs about her. A Wolf who longed for a little 
one, but knew not how to come by it, endeavoured to 
insinuate herself in the good opinion of the mother. " How 
do you find yourself to-day, Mrs. Sow?" said she. " A 
little fresh air would certainly do you great good. Now, do 
go abroad and air yourself a little, and I will with pleasure 
mind your young ones till you return." " Many thanks for 
your offer," replied the Sow. " I know very well what kind 
of care you would take of my little ones. If you really 
wished to be as obliging as you pretend to be, you would 
not show me your face again." 



THE FOX AND THE GRAPES. 

A HUNGRY Fox one day saw some tempting Grapes hang 
ing at a good height from the ground. He made many 
attempts to reach them, but all in vain. Tired out by 
his failures, he walked off grumbling to -himself, " Nasty 
sour things, I know you are, and not at all fit for a gentle 
man's eating." 




THE FOX AND THE GRAPES. 



THE THRUSH AND THE SWALLOW. 103 



THE HUSBANDMAN AND THE STORK. 

A HUSBANDMAN set a net in his fields, to take the Cranes 
and Geese which came to feed upon the newly-springing 
corn. He took several, and with them a Stork, who pleaded 
hard for his life, on the ground that he was neither a Goose 
nor a Crane, but a poor, harmless Stork. " That may be 
very true," replied the Husbandman ; " but as I have taken 
you in bad company, you must expect to suffer the same 
punishment." 



THE THRUSH AND THE SWALLOW. 

A YOUNG Thrush, who lived in an orchard, once became 
acquainted with a Swallow. A friendship sprang up 
between them, and the Swallow, after skimming the orchard 
and the neighbouring meadow, would every now and then 

come and visit the Thrush. The Thrush, hopping from 

/ 

branch to branch, would welcome him with his most 
cheerful note. "Oh, mother!" said he to his parent, one 
day, " never had creature such a friend as I have in this 
same Swallow." " Nor ever any mother," replied the parent 
bird, " such a silly son as I have in this same Thrush. 
Long before the approach of winter, your friend will have 
left you, and while you sit shivering on a leafless bough, 
he will be sporting under sunny skies hundreds of miles 
away." 



io4 s SOP'S FABLES. 



THE FOWLER AND THE RING-DOVE. 

A FOWLER, seeing a Ring-Dove among the branches of an 
oak, put his piece to his shoulder and aimed at the bird. 
Just then an Adder, on which unknowingly he had trodden, 
bit him in the leg. Feeling the poison spreading in his 
veins, he threw down his gun, and exclaimed, " Fate has 
justly brought destruction on me while I was contriving the 
death of another ! " 



THE LION, AND THE ASSES AND HARES. 

UPON the breaking out of a war between the birds and the 
beasts, the Lion summoned all his subjects between the ages 
of sixteen and sixty, to appear in arms at a certain time and 
place, upon pain of his high displeasure. A number of 
Hares and Asses made their appearance on the field. 
Several of the commanders were for turning them off and 
discharging them, as creatures utterly unfit for service. 
" Do not be too hasty," said the Lion ; " the Asses will do 
very well for trumpeters, and the Hares will make excellent 
letter-carriers." 



THE SENSIBLE Ass. 



105 




THE SENSIBLE ASS. 

AN Old Fellow, in time of war, was allowing his Ass to 
feed in a green meadow, when he was alarmed by a sudden 
advance of the enemy. He tried every means in his power 
to urge the Ass to fly, but in vain. "The enemy are 
upon us," said he. " And what will the enemy do ?" asked 
the Ass. " Will they put two pairs of panniers on my back, 
instead of one?" " No," answered the Man, "there is no 
fear of that." "Why then," replied the Ass, " I'll not stir 
an inch. I am born to be a slave, and my greatest enemy 
is he who gives me most to carry." 



io6 s 'SOP'S FABLES. 



THE WOLVES AND THE SHEEP. 

THE Wolves and the Sheep once made a treaty of peace. 
The Sheep were to give up their Dogs, and the Wolves 
their young ones, as hostages or security for its due ob 
servance. The young Wolves cried for their dams, and the 
Wolves thereupon alleged that the peace had been broken, 
and set upon the Sheep, who, deprived of their defenders 
the Dogs, could make no resistance. 



THE YOUNG MAN AND HIS CAT. 

A YOUNG MAN became so fond of his Cat, that he made her 
his constant companion, and used to declare that if she were 
a woman he would marry her. Venus at length, seeing 
how sincere was his affection, gratified his wishes, and 
changed the Cat into a young and blooming woman. They 
were accordingly married ; but at night, hearing a Mouse in 
the room, the young bride sprang from the arms of her 
husband, caught the Mouse, and killed it. , Venus, angry at 
this behaviour, and seeing that under the form of a woman 
there was still hidden the nature of a Cat, determined that 
form and nature should no longer disagree, and changed 
her back again to a Cat. 



THE HART AND THE VINE, 107 



THE MAN AND THE FOXES. 

A MAN whose vines and orchards had suffered greatly from 
the ravages of Foxes, one day caught one of these animals 
in a trap. In a great rage he tied up the Fox's tail with 
tow that had been steeped in turpentine, set a light to it, 
and let him run. Mad with pain and fright, the Fox ran 
through a large field in which, ripe for the harvest, stood 
corn belonging to his tormentor. The corn caught fire, 
and the flames, fanned by the wind, spread over the field 
and laid it waste. The Man lamented bitterly that he had 
not chosen some safer and less cruel means of revenge. 



THE HART AND THE VINE. 

A HART being hard pursued by the hunters, hid himself 
under the broad leaves of a shady, spreading Vine. When 
the hunters had gone by, and given him over for lost, he 
thought himself quite secure, and began to crop and eat 
the leaves of the Vine. The rustling of the branches drew 
the eyes of the hunters that way, and they shot their arrows 
there at a venture, and killed the Hart. In dying, he ad 
mitted that he deserved his fate, for his ingratitude in 
destroying the friend who had so kindly sheltered him in 
time of danger. 



io8 



FABLES. 



THE EAGLE AND THE CROW. 

A CROW watched an Eagle swoop with a majestic air from 
a neighbouring cliff upon a flock of Sheep, and carry away 
a Lamb in his talons. The whole thing looked so graceful 
and so easy withal, that the Crow at once proceeded to 
imitate it, and pouncing upon the back of the largest and 
fattest Ram he could see, he tried to make off with it. He 
found not only that he could not move the Ram, but that 
his claws got so entangled in the animal's fleece, that he 
could not get away himself. He therefore became an easy 
prey to the Shepherd, who, coming up at the time, caught 
him, cut his wings, and gave him to his children for a 
plaything. 





THE EAGLE AND THE CROW. 



THE HUSBANDMAN THAT LOST HIS MATTOCK. m 



THE HUSBANDMAN THAT LOST HIS 

MATTOCK. 

A HUSBANDMAN, busily employed in trenching his vineyard, 
laid down for awhile the Mattock he was using. When he 
went to take it up again, it was gone. He called together 
all his hired men, and asked them if they had seen the tool. 
They all denied any knowledge of it ; and the Man, in a 
great rage, said he knew that one of them must have taken 
it, and, let it cost him what it might, he would find out the 
thief. With that view he insisted upon their going with 
him to the shrine of a famous oracle in a neighbouring city. 
Arrived within the city gates, they stopped at the fountain 
in the market-place, to bathe their feet. Just at that 
moment the town-crier came up, and in a loud voice 
announced that, the sacred shrine having been robbed last 
night, he was told to offer a large reward to any one who 
could discover the thief. Thereupon the Husbandman at 
once called upon his men to turn their faces homewards. 
" If this god," said he, " cannot tell who has robbed his 
temple, the chances are that he knows as little who has 
taken my Mattock." 



112 



s SOP'S FABLES. 



THE GNAT AND THE BULL. 

A STURDY Bull was driven by the heat of the weather 
to wade up to his knees in a cool and swift-running 
stream. He had not been long there when a Gnat, that 
had been disporting itself in the air, pitched upon one of 
his horns. " My dear fellow," said the Gnat, with as 
great a buzz as he could manage, " pray excuse the 
liberty I take. If I am too heavy, only say so, and I 
will go at once and rest upon the poplar which grows 
hard by at the edge of the stream." " Stay or go, it 
makes no matter to me," replied the Bull. " Had it not 
been for your buzz I should not even have known you 
were there." 




THE FOWLER AND THE BLACKBIRD. 




THE FOWLER AND THE BLACKBIRD. 

A FOWLER setting his nets in order, was curiously watched 
by a Blackbird, who could not forbear coming and asking the 
Man civilly what he was about. " I am making a nice little 
town for such as you," answered the Fowler, " and putting 
into it food and all manner of conveniencies." He then 
departed and hid himself. The Blackbird believing his 
words, came into the nets and was taken. " If this be your 
faith and honesty," said he to the Man, " I hope your town 
will have but few inhabitants." 




ii4 s SOP'S FABLES. 



THE TRUMPETER TAKEN PRISONER. 

UPON the defeat of an army in battle, a Trumpeter was 
taken prisoner. The soldiers were about to put him to 
death, when he cried, " Nay, gentlemen, why should you 
kill me? This hand of mine is guiltless of a single life." 
" Yes," replied the soldiers ; " but with that braying instru 
ment of yours you incite others, and you must share the 
same fate as they." 



THE ASS LADEN WITH SALT AND WITH 

SPONGE. 

A MAN drove his Ass to the sea-side, and having pur 
chased there a load of Salt, proceeded on his way home. 
In crossing a stream the Ass stumbled and fell. It was 
some time before he regained his feet, and by that time 
the Salt had all melted away, and he was delighted to 
find that he had lost his burden. A little while after 
that, the Ass, when laden with Sponges, had occasion to 
cross the same stream. Remembering his former good- 
luck, he stumbled this time on purpose., and was sur 
prised to find that his load, so far from disappearing, 
became many times heavier than before. 



THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE. 



THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE. 

THE Hare, one day, laughing at the Tortoise for his 
slowness and general unvvieldiness, was challenged by the 
latter to run a race. The Hare, looking on the whole affair 
as a great joke, consented, and the Fox was selected to act 
as umpire, and hold the stakes. The rivals started, and 
the Hare, of course, soon left the Tortoise far behind. 
Having reached midway to the goal, she began to play 
about, nibble the young herbage, and amuse herself in 
many ways. The day being warm, she even thought she 
would take a little nap in a shady spot, as, if the Tortoise 
should pass her while she slept, she could easily overtake 
him again before he reached the end. The Tortoise mean 
while plodded on, unwavering and unresting, straight 
towards the goal. The Hare, having overslept herself, 
started up from her nap, and was surprised to find that the 
Tortoise was nowhere in sight. Off she went at full speed, 
but on reaching the winning-post,, found that the Tortoise 
was already there, waiting for her arrival. 




n6 sEsop's FABLES. 



THE FOX AND THE BOAR. 

A BOAR stood whetting his tusks against an old tree. A 
Fox happened to pass by, and asked him what he meant by 
such warlike preparation, there being, as far as he knew, no 
enemy in sight. " That may be," answered the Boar ; 
" but when the enemy is in sight it is time to think 
about something else/' 



THE SICK STAG. 

A STAG, whose joints had become stiff with old age, was 
at great pains to get together a large heap of fodder- 
enough, as he thought, to last him for the remainder of 
his days. He stretched himself out upon it, and, now 
dozing, now nibbling, made up his mind to quietly wait 
for the end. He had always been of a gay and lively 
turn, and had made in his time many friends. These 
now came in great numbers to see him, and wish him 
farewell. While engaged in friendly talk over past 
adventures and old times, what more natural than that 
they should help themselves to a little of the food which 
seemed so plentifully stored around ? The end of the 
matter was, that the poor Stag died not so much of 
sickness or of old a^e as for sheer want of the food 

o 

which his friends had eaten for him. 




THE FOX AND THE BOAR. 



THE HORSE AND THE LADEN Ass. 119 



THE ASS EATING THISTLES. 

AN Ass laden with very choice provisions, which he was 
carrying in harvest-time to the field, for the entertainment 
of his master and the reapers, stopped by the way to eat a 
large and strong Thistle that grew by the roadside. " Many 
people would wonder," said he, " that with such delicate 
viands within reach, I do not touch them ; but to me this 
bitter and prickly Thistle is more savoury and relishing than 
anything else in the world." 



THE HORSE AND THE LADEN ASS. 

A FULL-FED, lazy Horse was travelling along in company 
with a heavily-laden Ass, belonging to the same master. 
The Ass, whose back was nearly breaking with his load, 
besought the Horse, for the sake of common kindness, to 
take a portion of it. The Horse, in his pride and ill- 
nature, refused ; and the poor Ass, after staggering on a 
little further, fell down and died. The master thereupon 
laid the whole of the burden upon the Horse's back, and 
the skin of the Ass besides. 




120 AL SOP'S FABLES. 



THE PEACH, THE APPLE, AND THE 
BLACKBERRY. 

THERE happened a controversy once between a Peach and 
an Apple as to which was the fairer fruit of the two. 
They were so loud in their discourse, that a Blackberry 
from the next hedge overheard them. "Come," said the 
Blackberry, " we are all friends, and pray let us have no 
jangling among ourselves." 



THE DRUNKEN HUSBAND. 

A CERTAIN woman had a Drunken Husband, whom she had 
tried in many ways to reclaim. It was all of no use. 
One night when he was brought home, as usual, quite un 
conscious, she had him carried to a neighbouring tomb. 
Dressing herself in a weird costume, and with a mask upon 
her face, she awaited his return to his senses. Then, 
advancing in a solemn manner, she offered him some food, 
saying in a sepulchral tone, " Arise and eat. It is my 
office to bring food to the dead/' " Ah," said he, " if you 
had known me better, you would have brought me some 
thing to drink instead." 




THE OLD MAN AND DEATH. 



I 21 




THE OLD MAN AND DEATH. 

A POOR and toil-worn Peasant, bent with years, and 
groaning beneath the weight of a heavy faggot of firewood 
which he carried, sought, weary and sore-footed on a long 
and dusty road, to gain his distant cottage. Unable to bear 
the weight of his burden any longer, he let it fall by the 
roadside,' and sitting down upon it, lamented his hard fate. 
What pleasure had he known since first he drew breath in 
this sad world ? From dawn to dusk one round of ill- 
requited toil ! At home, empty cupboards, a discontented 
wife, and disobedient children ! He called on Death to 
free him from his troubles. At once the King of Terrors 
stood before him, and asked him what he wanted. Awed 



122 ssop's FABLES. 



at the ghastly presence, the Old Fellow stammering said, 
it was nothing more than to have helped once more 
upon his shoulders the bundle of sticks which he had 
let fall. 



THE OLD WOMAN AND THE DOCTOR. 

AN Old Woman that had bad eyes called in a clever 
Doctor, who agreed for a certain sum to cure them. He 
was a very clever Doctor, but he was also a very great 
rogue ; and when he called each day and bound up the 
Old Woman's eyes, he took advantage of her blindness 
to carry away with him some article of her furniture. 
This went on until he pronounced the Woman cured. 
Her room was then nearly bare. He claimed his reward, 
but the Old Lady protested that, so far from being cured, 
her sight was worse than ever. " We will soon see about 
that, my good Woman," said he ; and she was shortly 
after summoned to appear in Court. " May it please your 
Honour," said she to the Judge, " before I called in this 
Doctor I could see a score of things in my room that 
now, when he says I am cured, I cannot see at all." 
This opened the eyes of the Court to the knavery of the 
Doctor, who was forced to give the Old Woman her 
property back again, and was not allowed to claim a 
penny of his fee. 



THE WOLF IN SHEEP'S CLOTHING. 



THE WOLF IN SHEEP'S CLOTHING. 

A WOLF, wrapping himself in the skin of a Sheep, by 
that means got admission into a sheepfold, where he de 
voured several of the young Lambs. The Shepherd, how 
ever, soon found him out and hung him up to a tree, still 
in his assumed disguise. Some other Shepherds passing 
that way, thought it was a Sheep hanging, and cried to 
their friend, "What, brother! is that the way you serve 
Sheep in this part of the country?" " No, friends," cried 
he, giving at the same time the carcase a swing round, 
so that they might see what it was ; " but it is the way to 
serve Wolves, even though they be dressed in Sheep's 
clothing." 




j 2 j. ^E SOP'S FABLES. 



THE MAN AND THE WEASEL. 

A MAN caught a Weasel, and was about to kill it. The 
little animal prayed earnestly for his life. "You will not 
be so unkind," said he to the Man, " as to slay a poor 
creature who kills your Mice for you?" "For me!" 
answered the Man ; " that's a good joke. For me, you say, 
as if you did not catch them more for your own pleasure 
than for my profit. And in respect of eating and gnawing 
my victuals, you know that you do as much harm as the 
Mice themselves. You must make some better excuse than 
that, before I shall feel inclined to spare you." Having 
said this, he strangled the Weasel without more ado. 



THE COVETOUS MAN. 

A MISER once buried all his money in the earth, at the foot 
of a tree, and went every day to feast upon the sight of his 
treasure. A thievish fellow, who had watched him at this 
occupation, came one night and carried off the gold. The 
next day the Miser, finding his treasure gone, tore his 
clothes and filled the air with his lamentations. One of 
his neighbours told him that if he viewed the matter aright 
he had lost nothing. "Go every day," said he, " and fancy 
your money is there, and you will be as well off as ever." 




THE COVETOUS MAN. 



THE BEES, THE DRONES, AND THE WASP. 127 



THE HEN AND THE SWALLOW. 

THERE was once a foolish Hen, that sat brooding upon a 
nest of Snakes' eggs. A Swallow perceiving it, flew to her, 
and told her what danger she was in, " Be assured," said 
she, " you are hatching your own destruction. The mo 
ment these young ones see the light, they will turn and 
wreak their venomous spite upon you." 



THE BEES, THE DRONES, AND THE WASP. 

A PARTY of Drones got into a hive, and laying claim to 
the honey and comb which they found there, tried to force 
the Bees to quit. The Bees, however, made a sturdy 
resistance, and the Drones were not unwilling to agree to 
their proposal that the dispute should be referred for judg 
ment to the Wasp. The Wasp, pretending that it was a 
hard matter to decide, directed both parties to make and fill 
some comb before him in court, so that he might see whose 
production most resembled the property in dispute. The 
Bees at once set to work, but the Drones refused the trial ; 
so the verdict was given by Judge Wasp in favour of the 
Bees. 



128 ^E SOP'S FABLES. 



THE FISHERMAN AND TROUBLED WATER. 

A CERTAIN Fisherman having laid his nets in a river, took 
a long pole, and fell a-beating the water, to frighten the fish 
into his nets. One of the people who lived thereabout 
came and said to him, with surprise, " Why, what are you 
doing there, splashing and dashing the water about at that 
rate? You muddle the stream, and completely spoil our 
drink." "Well," replied the Fisherman, "all I know is, I 
must either spoil your drink, or have nothing to eat." 



THE FROG AND THE MOUSE. 

A FROG and a Mouse, who had long been rivals for the 
sovereignty of a certain marsh, and had many a skirmish 
and running fight together, agreed one day to settle the 
matter, once for all, by a fair and open combat. They met, 
and each, armed with the point of a bulrush for a spear, 
was ready, if need be, to fight to the death. The fight 
began in earnest, and there is no knowing how it might 
have ended, had not a Kite, seeing them from afar, pounced 
down and carried off both heroes in her talons. 



THE ANGLER AND THE LITTLE FISH. 



129 




THE ANGLER AND THE LITTLE FISH. 

A FISHERMAN who 'had caught a very little Fish was about 
to throw him into his basket. The little fellow, gasping, 
pleaded thus for his life : " What ! you are never going to 
keep such a little chap as I am, not one quarter grown ! 
Fifty such as I am wouldn't make a decent dish. Do throw 
me back, and come and catch me again when I am bigger." 
" It's all very well to say ' Catch me again/ my little fellow," 
replied the Man, " but you know you'll make yourself very 
scarce for the future. You're big enough to make one in a 
frying-pan, so in you go." 



SSOP'S FABLES. 



THE HARE AND THE HOUND. 

A DOG having given a long chase to a fine Hare, that 
showed himself to be a splendid runner, was at length 
forced, by want of breath, to give over the pursuit. The 
owner of the Dog thereupon taunted him upon his want 
of spirit in having allowed himself to be beaten by the 
Hare. " Ah, master," answered the Dog, " it's all very 
well for you to laugh, but we had not the same stake at 
hazard. He was running for his life, while I was only 
running for my dinner." 



THE BLACKAMOOR. 

A CERTAIN Man who had bought a Blackamoor, said it 
was all nonsense about black being the natural colour of his 
skin. "He has been dirty in his habits," said he, "and 
neglected by his former masters. Bring me some hot 
water, soap, and scrubbing-brushes, and a little sand, and 
we shall soon see what his colour is." So he scrubbed, and 
his servants scrubbed, till they were all tired. They made 
no difference in the colour of the Blackamoor ; but the end 
of it all was, that the poor fellow caught cold and died. 



THE TRA VELLERS. 



THE THIEVES AND THE COCK. 

SOME Thieves once broke into a house, but found nothing 
in it worth carrying off but a Cock. The poor Cock said 
as much for himself as a Cock could say, urging them to 
remember his services in calling people up to their work 
when it was time to rise. " Nay," said one of the Robbers, 
" you had better say nothing about that. You alarm people 
and keep them waking, so that it is impossible for us to rob 
in comfort' 



As two Men were travelling through a wood, one of them 
took up an axe which he saw lying upon the ground. 
" Look here," said he to his companion, " I have found an 
axe." " Don't say '/have found it/" says the other, "but 
' We have found it.' As we are companions, we ought to 
share it between us." The first would not, however, con 
sent. They had not gone far, when they heard the owner of 
the axe calling after them in a great passion. "We are in 
for it!" said he who had the axe. " Nay," answered the 
other, "say, */'m in for it!' not ive. You would not let 
me share the prize, and I am not going to share the danger." 



FABLES. 



THE COCK AND THE FOX. 

A COCK, perched among the branches of a lofty tree, 
crowed aloud. The shrillness of his voice echoed through 
the wood, and the well-known note brought a Fox, who 
was prowling in quest of prey, to the spot. Reynard, 
seeing the Cock was at a great height, set his wits to work 
to find some way of bringing him down. He saluted the 
bird in his mildest voice, and said, " Have you not heard, 
cousin, of the proclamation of universal peace and harmony 
among all kinds of beasts and birds ? We are no longer 
to prey upon and devour one another, but love and friend 
ship are to be the order of the day. Do come down, and 
we will talk over this great news at our leisure." The 
Cock, who knew that the Fox was only at his old tricks, 
pretended to be watching something in the distance, and 
the Fox asked him what it was he looked at so 
earnestly. " Why," said the Cock, " I think I see a pack 
of Hounds yonder." " Oh, then," said the Fox, " your 
humble servant; I must be gone." "Nay, cousin," said 
the Cock ; " pray do not go : I am just coming down. You 
are surely not afraid of Dogs in these peaceable times ! " 
" No, no," said the Fox ; " but ten to one whether they 
have heard of the proclamation yet." 





THE COCK AND THE FOX. 



THE LION, THE Fox, AND THE WOLF. 135 



MERCURY AND THE CARVER. 

MERCURY, having a mind to know how much he was 
esteemed among men, disguised himself, and going into a 
Carver's shop, where little images were sold, saw those of 
Jupiter, Juno, himself, and most of the other gods and 
goddesses. Pretending that he wanted to buy, he said to 
the Carver, pointing to the figure of Jupiter, " What do 
you ask for that ?" " A shilling," answered the Man. 
" And what for that ?" meaning Juno. " Ah," said the 
man, " I must have something more for that eighteen- 
pence, let us say/' " Well, and what, again, is the price of 
this?" said Mercury, laying his hand on a figure of him 
self, with wings, rod, and all complete. " Why," replied 
the man, " if you really mean business, and will buy the 
other two, I'll throw you that fellow into the bargain." 



THE LION, THE FOX, AND THE WOLF. 

THE King of the Forest was once long and seriously ill, 
and his majesty's temper not being at all improved by the 
trial, the Fox, with his usual discretion, kept away from 
Court as much as he could. He slunk about, however, 
as near as he was able without being seen, and one day 
overheard the Wolf talking to the Lion about him. The 
Wolf and the Fox were never good friends, and the Wolf 



136 s SOP'S FABLES. 



was now calling the Lion's attention to the fact that the 
Fox had not shown his face for a long time at Court, 
and added that he had strong reasons for suspecting that 
he was busily engaged in hatching some treason or other. 
The Lion thereupon commanded that the Fox should be 
brought at once to his presence, and the Jackal was 
accordingly sent to look for him. The Fox, being asked 
what he had to say for himself, replied that his absence, 
so far from arising from any want of respect for his 
sovereign, was the result of his extreme concern for his 
welfare. He had gone far and wide, he said, and con 
sulted the most skilful physicians as to what was the 
best thing to be done to cure the King's most grievous 
malady. " They say," stated he (and here he gave a 
malicious leer at the Wolf), " that the only thing to save 
your majesty's life is to wrap yourself in the warm skin 
torn from a newly-killed Wolf." The Lion, eager to try 
the experiment, at once dragged the Wolf towards him, 
and killed him on the spot. 




THE MAN AND HIS WOODEN GOD. 




THE MAN AND HIS WOODEN GOD. 

A POOR Man, who longed to get rich, used to pray day 
and night for wealth, to a Wooden Idol which he had in 
his house. Notwithstanding all his prayers, instead of 
becoming richer, he got poorer. Out of all patience with 
his Idol, he one day took it by the legs, and dashed it to 
pieces upon the floor. Hundreds of gold pieces, which had 
been hidden in the body, flew about the room. Transported 
at the sight, he exclaimed, " How have I wasted my time in 
worshipping a graceless deity, who yields to force what he 
would not grant to prayers ! " 



18 



138 sE SOP'S FABLES. 



THE APE AND HER TWO YOUNG ONES. 

AN Ape who had two Young Ones was very fond of one, 
and took but little notice of the other. One day, finding 
the Dogs after her, she caught up her pet in her arms, and 
ran off. Blind with fright, she knocked the Little One's 
head against a tree, and dashed out its brains. The other 
Young One, W 7 ho had clung by himself to his mother's 
rough back, escaped unharmed. 



THE FOX IN THE WELL. 

AN unlucky Fox having fallen into a Well, was able, by 
dint of great efforts, just to keep his head above water. 
While he was there struggling, and sticking his claws 
into the side of the Well, a Wolf came by and looked in. 
" What ! my dear brother," said he, with affected concern, 
" can it really be you that I see down there ? How cold 
you must feel ! How long have you been in ? How came 
you to fall in ? I am so pained to see you. Do tell me 
all about it!" "The end of a rope would be of more use 
to me than all your pity," answered the Fox. " Just help 
me to set my foot once more on solid ground, and you 
shall have the whole story." 



THE KNIGHT AND HIS CHARGER. 



139 



THE KNIGHT AND HIS CHARGER. 

A CERTAIN Knight, in time of war, took great pains to 
keep his Horse well fed and cared-for, and in first-rate 
condition. When the war was over, the Knight's pay 
was reduced, and he allowed his Horse, that had carried 
him nobly through many a hot engagement, to be used for 
dragging huge logs of timber, and for hire in many other 
rough and disagreeable ways. Being thus hardly fed and 
badly treated, the animal's strength and spirit fell away. 
It was not long before the war was renewed, and the 
Knight, taking his Horse to himself again, tried, by good 
feeding and better treatment, to make him into a battle- 
steed once more. There was not time for this, however; 
and the Horse, as his weak legs gave way under him 
in a charge, said to his master, " It is too late now to 
repair your neglect. You have degraded me from a 
Horse into an Ass. It is not my fault that I can no 
longer bear you as before." 




140 ^E 'SOP'S FABLES. 



THE BEAR AND THE BEE-HIVES. 

A BEAR that had found his way into a garden where* Bees 
were kept, began to turn over the Hives and devour the 
honey. The Bees settled in swarms about his head, and 
stung his eyes and nose so much, that, maddened with 
pain, he tore the skin from his head with his own claws. 



THE HUSBANDMAN AND THE EAGLE. 

A HUSBANDMAN, who was out walking one fine day, met 
with an Eagle caught in a snare. Struck with the beauty 
of the bird, and being a kind-hearted fellow, he let the 
Eagle fly. The sun was shining fiercely, and the Man 
soon after sought out a cool spot in the shadow of an 
old wall, and sat down upon a stone. He was surprised, 
in a few moments, by the Eagle making a descent upon 
his head and carrying off his hat. The bird bore it off 
to some distance, and let it fall. The Man ran after his 
hat and picked it up, wondering why an Eagle to which 
he had shown so much kindness should play him such 
a mischievous trick in return. He turned round to go 
back again to his seat by the wall, and great was his 
astonishment and thankfulness to see, where the wall 
had stood, nothing but a heap of stones. 




THE BEAR AND THE BEEHIVES. 



THE SHEPHERD TURNED MERCHANT. 143 



THE FOX AND THE WOLF. 

A WOLF who lived in a cave, having laid in a good 
store of provisions, kept himself very close, and set to 
work to enjoy them. A Fox, who missed the Wolf from 
his usual haunts, at last found out where he was, and, 
under pretence of asking after his health, came to the 
mouth of the cave and peeped in. He expected to be asked 
inside to partake, but the Wolf gruffly said that he was 
far too ill to see anybody. So the Fox trotted off again, 
in anything but a charitable state of mind. Away he went 
to a Shepherd, and told the Man to provide himself with 
a good stick and come with him, and he would show him 
where to find a Wolf. The Shepherd came accordingly, and 
killed the Wolf. The Fox thereupon took possession of the 
cave and its stores. He did not, however, long enjoy the 
fruits of his treachery, for the Man, passing by that way a 
few days after, looked into the cave, and seeing the Fox 
there, killed him too. 



THE SHEPHERD TURNED MERCHANT. 

A SHEPHERD that kept his Sheep at no great distance 
from the sea, one day drove them close to the shore, and 
sat down on a rock to enjoy the cool breeze. It was a beau 
tiful summer day, and the ocean lay before him, calm, 

* 



144 sEsop's FABLES. 



smooth, and of an enchanting blue. As he watched the white 
sails, and listened to the measured plash of the tiny wave 
lets on the pebbled beach, his heart thrilled with pleasure. 
" How happy," exclaimed he, " should I be if, in a tight, 
trim bark of my own, with wings like a bird, I could 
skim that lovely plain, visit other lands, see other peoples, 
and become rich in ministering to their wants and* 
pleasures !" He sold his flock, and all that he had, bought 
a small ship, loaded her with dates, and set sail. A 
storm arose : the cargo was thrown overboard to lighten 
the ship, but in spite of all efforts she was driven upon a rock 
near the shore, and went to pieces. The Shepherd narrowly 
escaped with his life, and was afterwards glad to earn his 
bread by watching the flock which had formerly been his 
own. In the course of time, when, by care and frugality, 
he had again become possessed of some amount of wealth, 
he happened to find himself sitting on the self-same rock, 
and on just such another day as that on which he had 
resolved to become a Merchant. " Deceitful and tempting 
element!" cried he to the sea; " in vain you try to engage 
me a second time. Others may confide their treasure to 
your treacherous care, but never, while I live, will I trust 
thy faithless bosom more." 



THE ANTS AND THE GRASSHOPPER. 




THE ANTS AND THE GRASSHOPPER. 

A GRASSHOPPER that had merrily sung all the summer, was 
almost perishing with hunger in the v/inter. So she went 
to some Ants that lived near, and asked them to lend her a 
little of the food they had put by. " You shall certainly 
be paid before this time of year comes again," said she. 
"What did you do all the summer?" asked they. "Why, 
all day long, and all night long too, I sang, if you please," 
answered the Grasshopper." "Oh, you sang, did you?" said 
the Ants. " Now, then, you can dance." 



i_j.6 sEsoPS FABLES. 



THE DOG INVITED TO SUPPER. 

A CERTAIN rich man invited a person of high rank to sup 
with him. Extraordinary preparations were made for the 
repast, and all the delicacies of the season provided. The 
Dog of the host, having long wished to entertain another 
Dog, a friend of his, thought this would be a capital time, 
to ask him to come. As soon, therefore, as it fell dusk, 
the invited Dog came, and was shown by his friend into 
the kitchen. The preparations there filled him with 
astonishment, and he resolved that when the time came, 
he would eat enough to last him a week. He wagged his 
tail so hard, and licked his chaps in anticipation with so 
much vigour, that he attracted the notice of the head cook, 
who, seeing a strange Dog about, caught him up by the 
tail, and after giving him a swing in the air, sent him 
flying through the open window into the street. He limped 
away, and was soon surrounded by a lot of Curs to whom 
he had boasted of his invitation. They asked him eagerly 
how he had fared, " Oh, rarely," answered he. " I went 
on to that extent, that I hardly knew which way I got out 
of the house." 




THE LION AND THE ELEPHANT. 



1 17 



THE LION AND THE ELEPHANT. 

THE Lion complained most sadly that a beast with such 
claws, teeth, and strength as he possessed, should yet be 
moved to a state of abject terror at the crowing of a 
Cock. " Can life be worth having," said he, " when so 
vile a creature has the power to rob it of its charms?" 
Just then, a huge Elephant came along, flapping his ears 
quickly to 'and fro, with an air of great concern. " What 
troubles you so?" said the Lion to the Elephant. "Can 
any mortal thing have power to harm a beast of your 
tremendous bulk and strength?" "Do you see this little 
buzzing Gnat?" replied the Elephant; "let him but 
sting the inmost recesses of my ear, and I shall go mad 
with pain." The Lion thereupon took heart again, and 
determined not to let troubles, which he shared in com 
mon with all created things, blind him to what was 
pleasant in life. 




148 s SOP'S FABLES. 



THE WOLVES AND THE SICK ASS. 

AN Ass being sick, the report of it was spread abroad in 
the country, and some did not hesitate to say that she 
would die before the night was over. Upon this, several 
Wolves came to the stable where she lay, and rapping at 
the door, inquired how she did. The young Ass came out, 
and told them that her mother was much better than they 
desired. 



THE LION AND THE GNAT. 

A LIVELY and impudent Gnat was daring enough to 
attack a Lion, whom he so enraged by stinging the most 
sensitive parts of his nose, eyes, and ears, that the beast 
roared in anguish, and, maddened with pain, tore himself 
cruelly with his claws. All the attempts of the Lion to 
crush the Gnat were in vain, and the insect returned 
again and again to the charge. At last the poor beast 
lay exhausted and bleeding upon the ground. The Gnat, 
hovering over the spot, and sounding a tiny trumpet note 
of triumph, happened to come in the way of the delicate 
web of a Spider, which, slight as it was, was enough to 
stop him in his career. His efforts to escape only fixed 
him more firmly in the toils, and he who had vanquished 
the Lion became the prey of the Spider. 




THE WOLVES AND THE SICK ASS. 



THE FIGHTING COCKS, 



JUPITER AND THE HERDSMAN. 

A HERDSMAN missing a young Heifer that belonged to 
the herd, went up and down the forest to seek it. Not 
being able to find it, he prayed to Jupiter, and promised 
to sacrifice a Kid if he would help him to find the thief. 
He then went on a little further, and suddenly came upon 
a Lion, grumbling over the carcase of the Heifer, and 
feeding upon it. "Great Jupiter!" cried the Man, "I 
promised thee a Kid, if thou wouldst show me the thief. I 
now offer thee a full-grown Bull, if thou wilt mercifully 
deliver me safe from his clutches." 



THE FIGHTING COCKS. 

Two Cocks fought for the sovereignty of the dunghill. 
One was severely beaten, and ran and hid himself in a 
hole. The conqueror flew to the top of an outhouse, there 
clapped his wings, and crowed out "Victory!" Just then 
an Eagle made a stoop, trussed him, and carried him 
off. The other, seeing this from his hiding-place, came 
out and, shaking off the recollection of his late disgrace, 
strutted about among his Hens with all the dignity 
imaginable. 



152 ^E 'SOPS FABLES. 



THE JACKDAW AND THE SHEEP. 

A JACKDAW sat chattering upon the back of a Sheep. 
" Peace, you noisy thing!" said the Sheep. " If I were a 
Dog, you would not serve me so." " True," replied the 
Jackdaw ; " I know that. I never meddle with the surly 
and revengeful, but I love to plague helpless creatures like 
you, that cannot do me any harm in return." 



THE CATS AND THE MICE. 

IN former times a fierce and lasting war raged between the 
Cats and Mice, in which, time after time, the latter had to 
fly. One day when the Mice in council were discussing the 
cause of their ill-luck, the general opinion seemed to be that 
it was the difficulty of knowing, in the heat of the conflict, 
who were their leaders, that led to their discomfiture and 
utter rout. It was decided that in future each chief of a 
division should have his head decorated with some thin 
straws, so that all the Mice would then know to whom they 
were to look for orders. So after the Mice had drilled and 
disciplined their numbers, they once more gave battle to the 
Cats. The poor fellows again met with no better success. 
The greater part reached their holes in safety, but the 
chieftains were prevented by their strange head-gear from 
entering their retreats, and without exception fell a prey to 
their ruthless pursuers. 



THE SPARROW AND THE HARE. 




THE SPARROW AND THE HARE. 

A HARE being seized by an Eagle, cried out in a piteous 
manner. A Sparrow sitting on a tree close by, so far from 
pitying the poor animal, made merry at his expense. 
"Why did you stay there to betaken?" said he. "Could 
not so swift a creature as you are have easily escaped 
from an Eagle?" Just then a Hawk swooped down and 
carried off the Sparrow, who, when he felt the Hawk's talons 
in his sides, cried still more loudly than the Hare. The 
Hare, in the agonies of death, received comfort from the 
fact that the fate of the mocking Sparrow was no better 
than his own. 



20 



FABLES. 



THE PLOUGHMAN AND FORTUNE. 

As a Countryman was one day turning up the ground with 
his plough, he came across a great store of treasure. 
Transported with joy, he fell upon the earth and thanked 
her for her kindness and liberality. Fortune appeared, and 
said to him, "You thank the ground thus warmly, and 
never think of me. If, instead of finding this treasure, you 
had lost it, I should have been the first you would have 
blamed." 



THE LION, THE FOX, AND THE ASS. 

AN Ass and a Fox were rambling through a forest one 
day, when they were met by a Lion. The Fox was 
seized with great fear, and taking the first opportunity 
of getting the ear of the Lion, thought to obtain his own 
safety at the expense of that of his companion. " Sire," 
said he, " yon same Ass is young and plump, and if 
your majesty would care to make a dinner off him, I 
know how he might be caught without much trouble. 
There is a pit-fall not far away, into which I can easily 
lead him." The Lion agreed, and seeing the Ass securely 
taken, he began his dinner by devouring the traitorous 
Fox, reserving the Ass to be eaten at his leisure. 



THE Ass CARRYING AN IDOL. 155 



THE ASS CARRYING AN IDOL. 

THE master of an Ass was employed to take an Idol 
from the shop of the sculptor where it was made to the 
temple in which it was to be placed. For this purpose 
it was put on the back of the Ass, and carried through 
the principal streets of the city. Seeing that all the 
people, as he went along, bent themselves in lowly reve 
rence, the animal fancied that it was to him that they 
were doing obeisance, and in consequence pricked up his 
ears, flourished his tail, and felt as proud as might be. 
The Idol once delivered, the man mounted his Ass and 
rode him home. The man was not at all pleased with 
the amount he had received for the job, and the poor 
brute, feeling the weight of his master's cudgel, and 
finding that the people now took not the slightest notice 
as he passed, saw that it was to the Idol, and not to 
himself, that the homage had been paid. 




^E SOP>S FABLES. 



THE KID AND THE WOLF. 

A KID, mounted upon a high rock, bestowed all manner of 
abuse upon a Wolf on the ground below. The Wolf, 
looking up, replied, " Do not think, vain creature, that you 
annoy me. I regard the ill language as coming not from 
you, but from the place upon which you stand." 



THE WOLF AND THE ASS. 

THE Wolves once selected one of their number to be 
their ruler. The Wolf that was chosen was a plausible, 
smooth-spoken rascal, and on a very early day he addressed 
an assembly of the Wolves as follows : " One thing," 
he said, " is of such vital importance, and will tend so 
much to our general welfare, that I cannot impress it too 
strongly upon your attention. Nothing cherishes true 
brotherly feeling and promotes the general good so much 
as the suppression of all selfishness. Let each one of 
you, then, share with any hungry brother who may be 
near whatever in hunting may fall to your lot." " Hear, 
hear!" cried an Ass, who listened to the speech; "and 
of course you yourself will begin with the fat Sheep that 
you hid yesterday in a corner of your lair." 




THE KID AND THE WOLF. 



THE A ss's SHADOW. 159 



THE WOLF AND THE SHEEP. 

A WOLF that had been sorely worried, and left for dead, 
by the Dogs, lay not far from a running stream. Parched 
with thirst, the babble of the brook sounded most tempt 
ingly in his ears, and he felt that one cool, delicious 
draught might yet restore to him some hope of life. 
Just then a Sheep passed near. " Pray, sister, bring me 
some water from yon stream," said he. "Water is all I 
want ; I do not ask for meat/' " Yes," replied the 
Sheep, " I know very well that when I have brought 
you water, my body will serve for meat." 



THE ASS'S SHADOW. 

A MAN, one hot day, hired an Ass, with his Driver, to 
carry some merchandise across a sandy plain. The sun's 
rays were overpowering, and, unable to advance further 
without a temporary rest, he called upon the Driver to 
stop, and proceeded to sit down in the Shadow of the 
Ass. The Driver, however, a lusty fellow, rudely pushed 
him away, and sat down on the spot himself. " Nay, 
friend," said the Driver, " when you hired this Ass of 
me you said nothing about the Shadow. If now you 
want that too, you must pay for it." 



!6o sEsop's FABLES. 



THE DEER AND THE LION. 

A DEER being hard pressed by the Hounds, found a cave, 
into which he rushed for safety. An immense Lion, couched 
at the farther end of the cave, sprang upon him in an 
instant. "Unhappy creature that I am!" exclaimed the 
Stag, in his dying moments. " I entered this cave to escape 
the pursuit of men and Dogs, and I have fallen into the 
jaws of the most terrible of wild beasts." 



THE SHEEP AND THE DOG. 

THE Sheep one day complained to the Shepherd that 
while they were shorn of their fleece, and their young 
ones often taken and killed for food, they received nothing 
in return but the green herbage of the earth, which grew 
of itself, and cost him no pains to procure. " On the 
other hand, your Dog," said they, " which gives no wool, 
and is of no use for food, is petted and fed with as good 
meat as his master." "Peace, bleating simpletons!" re 
plied the Dog, who overheard them; "were it not that I 
look after and watch you, and keep off Wolves and thieves, 
small good would be to you your herbage or anything 
else." 



THE HORSE AXD THE Liox. 



161 




THE HORSE AND THE LION. 

A LION, who had got old and infirm, saw a fine plump 
Nag, and longed for a bit of him. Knowing that .the 
animal would prove too fleet for him in the chase, he had 
recourse to artifice. He gave out to all the beasts that, 
having spent many years in studying physic, he was now 
prepared to hea.1 any malady or distemper with which they 
might be afflicted. He hoped by that means to get admit 
tance among them, and so find a chance of gratifying his 
appetite. The Horse, who had doubts of the Lion's honesty, 
came up limping, pretending that he had run a thorn into 
one of his hind feet, which gave him great pain. The Lion 
asked that the foot might be shown to him, and pored over 



1 62 ^ SOP'S FABLES. 



it with a mock earnest air. The Horse, slyly looking 
round, saw that he was preparing to spring, and vigorously 
sending out both his heels at once, -gave the Lion such a 
kick in the face, that it laid him stunned and sprawling 
upon the ground. Then laughing at the success of his 
trick, he trotted merrily away. 



THE WOLF AND THE KID. 

A WOLF spied a Kid that had strayed to a distance 
from the herd, and pursued him. The Kid, finding that 
he could not escape, waited till the Wolf came up, and 
then assuming a cheerful tone, said, " I see clearly enough 
that I must be eaten, but I would fain die as pleasantly 
as I could. Give me, therefore, a few notes of your pipe 
before I go to destruction." It seems that the Wolf was 
of a musical turn, and always carried his pipe with him. 
The Wolf played and the Kid danced, and the noise of 
the pipe brought the Dogs to the spot. The Wolf made 
off, saying, " This is what comes when people will go 
meddling out of their profession. My business was to 
play the butcher, not the piper." 




THE HEN AND THE Fox. 163 



THE GARDENER AND HIS DOG. 

A GARDENER'S Dog, frisking about the brink of a well in 
the garden, happened to fall in. The Gardener very readily 
ran to his assistance, but as he was trying to help him out, 
the Cur bit him by the hand. The Man, annoyed at what 
he considered such ungrateful behaviour towards one whose 
only aim was to save his life, came away and left the Dog 
to drown. 



THE HEN AND THE FOX. 

A Fox having crept into an outhouse, looked up and down 
for something to eat, and at last spied a Hen sitting upon a 
perch so high, that he could by no means come at her. He 
therefore had recourse to an old stratagem. " Dear cousin," 
said he to her, " How do you do? I heard that you were 
ill, and kept at home ; I could not rest, therefore, till I had 
come to see you. Pray let me feel your pulse. Indeed, 
you do not look well at all." He was running on in this 
impudent manner, when the Hen answered him from the 
roost, " Truly, dear Reynard, you are in the right. I was 
seldom in more danger than I am now. Pray excuse my 
coming down ; I am sure I should catch my death if I were 
to." The Fox, finding himself foiled, made off, and tried 
his luck elsewhere. 



164 & 'SOP'S FABLES. 



THE MAN AND THE GNAT. 

As a clownish fellow was sitting on a bank, a Gnat settled 
on his leg and stung it. The Man slapped his leg, meaning 
to kill the Gnat, but ifc flew away, and he had nothing but 
the blow for his pains. Again and again the insect alighted 
upon the leg, and again and again the Man struck at it, 
each time more savagely than before. His thigh became 
bruised all over, but the Gnat was still unharmed and 
lively. Almost mad with rage and disappointment, the 
fellow burst into tears. " O mighty Hercules !" cried he, 
" nothing can withstand thy power. Aid me, then, I 
beseech thee, against this terrible Gnat, which for an hour 
has tortured me beyond all bearing!" 



THE OLD HOUND. 

AN Old Hound, who had hunted well in his time, once 
seized a Stag, but from feebleness and the loss of his teeth 
was forced to let him go. The master coming up began to 
beat the Old Dog cruelly, but left off when the poor animal 
addressed him as follows : " Hold, dear master ! You know 
well that neither my courage nor my will was at fault, but 
only my strength and my teeth, and these I have lost in 
your service." 




THE OLD HOUND. 



THE MOUSE AND THE FROG. 167 



THE MOUSE AND THE FROG. 

A MOUSE and a Frog had lived some time in intimacy 
together, and the Frog had often visited the Mouse's 
quarters and been welcome to a share of his store. The 
Frog invited the Mouse to his house in return; but as 
this was across the stream, the Mouse, alleging that he 
could not swim, had hitherto declined to go. The Frog, 
however, one day pressed him so much, offering at the 
same time to conduct him safely across, that the Mouse 
consented. One of the fore-feet of the Mouse was 
accordingly bound to one of the hind-legs of the Frog 
by a stout blade of grass, and the friends set off to 
cross the stream. When about half way across, it 
treacherously entered the Frog's head to try to drown 
the Mouse. He thought that by that means he should 
have undivided possession of the latter's stock of pro 
visions. The Frog made for the bottom of the stream, 
but the struggles and cries of the Mouse attracted the 
attention of a Kite who was sailing above in the air. 
He descended and caught up the Mouse. The Frog, 
being tied to the Mouse, shared the same fate, and was 
justly punished for his treachery. 



i68 



^ 'sop y s FABLES. 



AND HIS FELLOW SERVANTS. 

A MERCHANT, who was at one time ^Esop's master, 
ordered all things to be got ready for an intended 
journey. When the burdens were being shared among 
the Servants, ^Esop requested that he might have the 
lightest. He was told to choose for himself, and he took 
up the basket of bread. The other Servants laughed, for 
that was the largest and heaviest of all. When dinner 
time came, /Esop, who had with some difficulty sustained 
his load, was told to distribute an equal share of bread 
all round. He did so, and this lightened his burden one 
half ; and when supper-time arrived he got rid of the 
rest. For the remainder of the journey he had nothing 
but the empty basket to carry, and the other Servants, 
whose loads seemed to get heavier and heavier at every 
step, could not but applaud his ingenuity. 




THE YOUNG MAN AND THE LION. 



169 




THE FOWLER AND THE LARK. 

A LARK, caught in a snare, pleaded earnestly with the 
Fowler for her life. " What have I done that I must 
die?" said she; " I have stolen neither gold nor silver, but 
only a grain of corn to satisfy my hunger." The Man, 
without deigning any reply, twisted her neck and threw 
her into his sack. 



THE YOUNG MAN AND THE LION. 
A CERTAIN rich man, lord of a great estate, had an only 
son, of whom he was doatingly fond. The Young Man 
delighted in hunting, and went every day into the forest, in 



170 sEsop's FABLES. 



chase of wild beasts. His father believed firmly in dreams, 
omens, prognostics, and the like, and dreaming one night 
that his son was killed by a Lion, resolved that he should 
not go to the forest any more. He therefore built a spacious 
tower, and kept the Young Man there closely confined. 
That his captivity might be less tedious to bear, he sur 
rounded him with books, music, and pictures ; and on the 
walls of the tower were painted in life-size all the beasts of 
the chase, and among the rest a Lion. The Young Man 
stood one day gazing for a long time at this picture, and, 
vexation at his unreasonable confinement getting the 
mastery over him, he struck the painted Lion a violent 
blow with his fist, saying, " Thou, cruel savage, art the 
cause of all my grief ! " The point of a nail in the wainscot 
under the canvas entered his hand ; the wound became in 
flamed, festered, and mortified, and the "Youth died from its 
effects. 



THE FOX AND THE ASS. 

AN Ass finding a Lion's skin, put it on, and ranged about 
the forest. The beasts fled in terror, and he was delighted 
at the success of his disguise. Meeting a Fox, he rushed 
upon him, and this time he tried to imitate as well the 
roaring of the Lion. " Ah," said the Fox, " if you had 
held your tongue, I should have been deceived like the rest; 
but now you bray, I know who you are." 



THE Fox AND THE COCK. 171 



THE FOX AND THE COCK. 

A Fox, passing early one summer's morning near a farm 
yard, was caught in a trap which the farmer had planted 
there for that purpose. A Cock saw at a distance what 
had happened, and hardly daring to trust himself too near 
so dangerous a foe, approached him cautiously and peeped 
at him, not without considerable fear. Reynard saw him, 
and in his most bewitching manner addressed him as 
follows : " See, dear cousin," said he, " what an unfortunate 
accident has befallen me here ! and, believe me, it is all on 
your account. I was creeping through yonder hedge, on 
my way homeward, when I heard you crow, and resolved, 
before I went any further, to come and ask you how you 
did. By the way I met with this disaster. Now if you 
would but run to the house and bring me a pointed stick, 
I think I could force it into this trap and free myself from 
its grip. Such a service I should not soon forget." The 
Cock ran off and soon came back, not without the stick; 
which, however, was carried in the hand of the sturdy 
farmer, to whom he had told the story, and who lost no 
time in putting it out of Master Fox's power to do any 
harm for the future. 



1 72 s SOP'S FABLES. 



THE GOURD AND THE PINE. 

A GOURD was planted close beside a large, well-spread 
Pine. The season was kindly, and the Gourd shot itself 
up in a short time, climbing by the boughs and twining 
about them, till it topped and covered the tree itself. 
The leaves were large, and the flowers and fruit fair, 
insomuch that the Gourd, comparing itself with the Pine, 
had the confidence to value itself above it upon the 
comparison. " Why," said the Gourd, " you have been 
more years growing to this stature than I have been 
days." " Well," replied the Pine, " but after the many 
winters and summers that I have endured, the many 
blasting colds and parching heats, you see me the very 
same thing that I was so long ago. But when you once 
come to the proof, the first blight or frost shall most 
infallibly bring down that pride of yours, and strip you 
of all your glory." 



THE GOAT AND THE LION. 

THE Lion seeing a Goat skipping about in high glee upon 
a steep craggy rock, called to him to come down upon the 
green pasture where he stood, and where he would be able 
to feed in much greater comfort. The Goat, who saw 
through the design of the Lion, replied, " Many thanks for 
your advice, dear Lion, but I wonder whether you are 
thinking most of my comfort, or how you would relish a 
nice morsel of Goat's flesh." 




THE GOAT AND THE LION. 



THE TONGUES. 175 



THE TONGUES. 

XANTHUS invited a large company to dinner, and ^Esop 
was ordered to furnish the feast with the choicest dainties 
that money could procure. The first course consisted of 
Tongues, cooked in different ways, and served with appro 
priate sauces. This gave rise to a deal of mirth and 
witty remarks among the assembled guests. The second 
course, however, like the first, was also nothing but 
Tongues, and so the third, and the fourth. The matter 
seemed to all to have gone beyond a jest, and Xanthus 
angrily demanded of ^Esop, " Did I not tell you, sirrah, 
to provide the choicest dainties that money could pro 
cure?" "And what excels the Tongue?" replied yEsop. 
" It is the great channel of learning and philosophy. By 
this noble organ addresses and eulogies are made, and 
commerce, contracts, and marriages completely established. 
Nothing is equal to the Tongue." The company applauded 
^Esop's wit, and good-humour was restored. " Well/' said 
Xanthus- to the guests, "pray do me the favour of dining 
with me again to-morrow. And if this is your best," con 
tinued he, turning to ^sop, " pray, to-morrow let us 
have some of the worst meat you can find." The next 
day, when dinner-time came, the guests were assembled. 
Great was their astonishment, and great the anger of 
Xanthus, at finding that again nothing but Tongues was 
put upon the table. " How, sir," said Xanthus, " should 
Tongues be the best of meat one day and the worst 
another?" "What," replied yEsop, "can be worse than 



y 'SOP'S 



the Tongue ? What wickedness is there under the sun 
that it has not a part in ? Treasons, violence, injustice, 
and fraud are debated, resolved upon, and communicated 
by the Tongue. It is the ruin of empires, cities, and of 
private friendships." The company were more than ever 
struck by ^Esop's ingenuity, and successfully interceded 
for him with his master. 



THE LOCUSTS AND THE GRASSHOPPER. 

A BOY, hunting for Locusts, had the fortune to find a 
Grasshopper, who, when she was about to be killed, 
pleaded thus for her life : " Alas ! I never did anybody 
an injury, and never had it either in my will or my 
power to do so. All my business is my song ; and what 
will you be the better for my death?" The Boy's heart 
relented, and he set the simple Grasshopper at liberty. 




THE WOLF, THE SHE-GOAT, AND THE KID. 



177 




THE WOLF, THE SHE-GOAT, AND THE KID. 

A SHE-GOAT, leaving her house one morning to look for 
food, told her Kid to bolt the door, and to open to no one 
who did not give as a pass-word, " A plague on the Wolf, 
and all his tribe." A Wolf who was hanging about, unseen 
by the Goat, heard her words, and when she was gone, 
came and tapped at the door, and imitating her voice, said, 
"A plague on the Wolf, and all his tribe." He made sure 
that the door would be opened at once ; but the Kid, whose 
suspicions were aroused, bade him show his beard, and he 
should be admitted directly. 



178 dEsop's FABLES. 



THE WOMAN AND THE FAT HEN. 

A WOMAN had a Hen that laid an egg every day. The 
Fowl was of a superior breed, and the eggs were very 
fine, and sold for a good price. The Woman thought 
that by giving the Hen double as much food as she had 
been in the habit of giving, the bird might be brought 
to lay two eggs a day instead of one. So the quantity 
of food was doubled accordingly, and the Hen grew very 
fat, and gave over laying altogether. 



THE FORTUNE-TELLER. 

A MAN who gave himself out for a Wizard and Fortune 
teller, used to stand in the market-place and pretend to 
cast nativities, give information as to missing property, 
and other matters of the like kind. One day, while he 
was busily plying his trade, a waggish fellow broke 
through the crowd, and gasping as if for want of breath, 
told him that his house was in flames, and must shortly 
be burnt to the ground. Off ran the Wizard at the news 
as fast as his legs could carry him, while the Wag and 
a crowd of other people followed at his heels. The 
house, it seems, was not on fire at all ; and the Wag 
asked him, amid the jeers of the people, how it was that 
he, who was so clever at telling other people's fortunes, 
should know so little of his own. 



JUPITER AND A BEE. 179 



THE BAT AND THE TWO WEASELS. 

A WEASEL seized upon a Bat, who begged hard for his 
life. " No, no," said the Weasel ; " I give no quarter to 
Birds." " Birds!" cried the Bat. "I am no Bird. I 
am a Mouse. Look at my body." And so she got off 
that time. A few days after she fell into the clutches 
of another Weasel, who, unlike the former, had a stronger 
antipathy to Mice than to Birds. The Bat cried for 
mercy. " No," said the Weasel ; " no mercy to a Mouse." 
" But," said the Bat, " you can see from my wings that 
I am a Bird/' And so she escaped that time as well. 



JUPITER AND A BEE. 

A BEE made Jupiter a present of a pot of honey, which 
was so kindly taken that he bade her ask what she would, 
and it should be granted her. The Bee desired that 
wherever she should set her sting it might be mortal. 
Jupiter was loth to leave mankind at the mercy of a 
little spiteful insect, and was annoyed at the ill-nature of 
her wish. He therefore said that, while for his promise 
sake he would give her the power to harm, she must be 
careful how she used the power, for where she planted 
her sting she would leave it, and with it lose her life. 



180 ^E SOP'S FABLES. 



THE RAVEN AND THE SERPENT. 

A HUNGRY Raven, searching for prey, came across a Snake 
lying at full length on a sunny bank. He seized him in 
his horny beak and would have devoured him, but the 
Snake, twisting and turning about, bit the Raven with his 
venomous fangs, so that he died in great pain. In dying, 
he confessed that he was justly served for seeking to satisfy 
his appetite at the expense of another's welfare. 



THE FOX AND THE CROW. 

A CROW having stolen a piece of cheese from a cottage 
window, flew with it to a tree that was some way off. 
A Fox, drawn by the smell of the cheese, came and sat 
at the foot of the tree, and tried to find some way of 
making it his. "Good morning, dear Miss Crow," said he. 
" How well you are looking to-day ! What handsome 
feathers yours are, to be sure ! Perhaps, too, your voice is 
as sweet as your feathers are fine. If so, you are really 
the Queen of Birds." The Crow, quite beside herself to 
hear such praise, at once opened a wide beak to let the 
Fox judge of her voice, and so let fall the cheese. The 
Fox snapped it up, and exclaimed, "Ah! ah! my good 
soul, learn that all who flatter have their own ends in view. 
That lesson will well repay you for a bit of cheese." 









^^x^SW 



1 - -^ ^ ^4 l " N * -.X 

rv^V\ 




THE FOX AND THE CROW. 



THE SEA AND THE RIVERS. 183 



THE ASS, THE APE, AND THE MOLE. 

AN Ass and an Ape were one day grumbling together 
over their respective grievances. " My ears are so long 
that people laugh at me," said the Ass; " I wish I had 
horns like the Ox." ''And I," said the Ape, "am really 
ashamed to turn my back upon any one. Why should 
not I have a fine bushy tail as well as that saucy fellow 
the Fox?" " Hold your tongues, both of you," said a 
Mole that overheard them, " and be thankful for what 
you have. The poor Moles have no horns at all, and 
no tail to speak of, and are nearly blind as well." 



THE SEA AND THE RIVERS. 

XANTHUS making merry one day with several students of 
philosophy, who were his companions, became intoxicated, 
and while in that state one of them, trying to make fun of 
him, said, " Xanthus, I have read somewhere that it is 
possible for a man to drink up the Sea. Do you believe 
it could be done ?" " Yes, easily," said Xanthus. " I'll 
wager you my house and lands, and all that I have, that I 
can do it myself." The wager was laid, and to confirm 
it they exchanged their rings. The next day Xanthus, 
missing his ring and finding a strange one in its place, 
asked ysop for an explanation. "Yesterday," replied 



1 84 



FABLES. 



A^sop, "you betted your whole fortune that you would 
drink up the sea; and to bind the wager you exchanged 
your ring." Xanthus was overwhelmed with perplexity, and 
eagerly besought JEsop to tell him what to do. " To per 
form your wager," said ^Esop, " you know is impossible, 
but I will show you how to evade it." They accordingly 
met the scholar, and went with him and a great number of 
people to the sea-shore, where ^Esop had provided a table 
with several large glasses upon it, and men stood around 
with ladles with which to fill them. Xanthus, instructed by 
ALsop, gravely took his seat at the table. The beholders 
looked on with astonishment, thinking that he must surely 
have lost his senses. " My agreement," said he, turning to 
the scholar, " is to drink up the Sea. I said nothing of the 
Rivers and Streams that are everywhere flowing into it. 
Stop up these, and I will proceed to fulfil my engagement." 




THE GARDENER AND HIS LANDLORD. 



'85 




THE FOX AND THE LION. 

THE first time the Fox saw the Lion, he nearly died with 
fright. The next time, he gathered sufficient courage to 
have a good stare. The third time, he went boldly up to 
the Lion, and commenced a familiar conversation with him. 



THE GARDENER AND HIS LANDLORD. 

A SIMPLE sort of Country Fellow, who rented a cottage and 
small garden on the outskirts of a park belonging to a 
great Squire, was much annoyed at the havoc which a 
certain Hare made with his choice and delicate young 
vegetables. So off went the Man, one morning, to complain 



1 86 sE SOP'S FABLES. 



to the Squire. "This Hare," said he, "laughs at all 
snares. He has a, charm which keeps off all the sticks and 
stones that I throw at him. In plain truth, I believe he is 
no Hare at all, but a wizard in disguise." " Nay, were he 
the father of all wizards," replied the Squire, who was a 
great hunter, " my Dogs will make short work with him. 
We'll come to-morrow, and see about it." The next 
morning came the Squire with his pack of Hounds, and a 
score of friends, huntsmen and others. The Gardener was 
at breakfast, and felt bound to ask them to partake. They 
praised the fare, which rapidly diminished, and joked so freely 
with the Gardener's daughter, a simple, modest girl, that 
her father was obliged to interfere, " Now, then, let us beat 
for the Hare," cried the Squire ; and the huntsmen blew their 
horns with deafening noise, and the Dogs flew here and 
there in search of the Hare, who was soon started from 
under a big cabbage where he had gone for shelter. Across 
the garden ran the Hare, and after him went the Dogs. 
Alas for the beds, the frames, the flowers ! Through the 
hedge \vent the Hare, and over the beds and through the 
hedge after him went the Squire, the friends, the huntsmen, 
horses and all. A wreck indeed did the place look, when 
they were gone. "Ah!" cried the Countryman, "fool 
that I was to go to the great for help! Here is more 
damage done in half an hour than all the Hares in the 
province would have made in a year!" 



JUPITERS Two WALLETS. 187 



THE HORSE AND THE HOG. 

A HOG that was lazily lying in the sun on a dung-heap 
saw a War-Horse advancing, on his way to the battle-field. 
The Horse was gaily caparisoned* and proudly spurned the 
ground, as if impatient to charge the enemy. The Hog 
half lifted his head and, grunting, said to him, " What a 
fool you are to be so ready to rush to your death !" " Your 
speech," replied the Horse, "fits well a vile animal, that 
only lives to get fat and be killed by the knife. If I die 
on the field, I die where duty calls me, and I shall leave the 
memory of a good name behind.'* 



JUPITER'S TWO WALLETS. 

WHEN Jupiter made Man, he gave him two Wallets 
one for his neighbour's faults, the other for his own. 
He threw them over the Man's shoulder, so that one 
hung in front and the other behind. The Man kept the 
one in front for his neighbour's faults, and the one 
behind for his own ; so that while the first was always 
under his nose, it took some pains to see the latter. 
This custom, which began thus early, is not quite un 
known at the present day. 



1 88 sEsop's FABLES. 



A BOAR CHALLENGES AN ASS. 

SOME hard words passed between a .Boar and an Ass, 
and a challenge followed upon them. The Boar, priding 
himself upon his tusks, and comparing his head with 
the Ass's head, looked forward to the fight with con 
fidence. The time for the battle came. The combatants 
approached one another. The Boar rushed upon the 
Ass, who, suddenly turning round, let his hoofs fly with 
all his might right in the jaws of the Boar. The Boar 
staggered again. "Well," said he, "who could have 
expected an attack from that end ?" 



THE ASS AND THE LION HUNTING. 

THE Lion once took a fancy to Hunting in company with 
an Ass. He sent the Ass into the forest, and told him to 
bray there as hard as he could. " By that means," said he, 
"you will rouse all the beasts in the forest. I shall stand 
here, and catch all that fly this way." The Ass brayed in 
his most hideous manner ; and when the Lion was tired of 
slaughter, he called to him to come out of the wood. " Did 
I not do my part well ?" asked the conceited beast. " Ex 
cellently well," replied the Lion. " Had I not known that 
you were nothing more than an Ass, I should have been 
frightened myself." 




THE ASS AND THE LION HUNTING. 



THE APE AND THE DOLPHIN. 191 



SOCRATES AND HIS FRIENDS. 

SOCRATES once built a house, and everybody who saw it 
had something or other to say against it. "What a 
front!" said one. "What an inside!" said another. 
"What rooms! not big enough to turn round in," said 
a third. " Small as it is," answered Socrates, " I wish 
I had true Friends enough to fill it." 



THE APE AND THE DOLPHIN. 

A SHIP, wrecked off the coast of Greece, had on board 
a large Ape, kept for the diversion of the sailors. The 
ship went down, and the Ape, with most of the crew, 
was left struggling in the water. Dolphins are said to 
have a great friendship for man, and one of these fishes, 
taking the Ape for a man, came under him and, sup 
porting him on his back, swam with him to the mouth 
of the Piraeus (a harbour in Greece so called). " In what 
part of Greece do you live?" demanded the Dolphin. 
" I am an Athenian," said the Ape. " Oh, then, you know 
Piraeus, of course?" said the Dolphin. "Know Piraeus!" 
cried the Ape, not wishing to appear ignorant to the 
Dolphin ; " I should rather think I did. Why, my 
father and he are first cousins." Thereupon the Dolphin, 
finding that he was supporting an impostor, slipped from 
beneath his legs, and left him to his fate. 



192 



FABLES. 



THE FOX AND THE HEDGEHOG. 

A Fox swimming across a river, was drifted along by the 
stream, and carried by an eddy into a nook on the oppo 
site bank. He lay there exhausted, and unable for a time 
to scramble up. To add to his misfortunes a swarm of 
Flies settled upon his head, and stung and plagued him 
grievously. A Hedgehog, that happened to be near the 
edge of the water, offered to drive away the Flies that 
molested and teased him in that sad manner. " Nay," cried 
the Fox, " pray let them alone. Those that are now upon 
me are already full almost to bursting with my blood. If 
you drive them away, a fresh swarm of hungry rascals will 
take their places, and I shall not have a drop of blood left 
in my body." 




THE CAT AND THE Fox. 




THE CAT AND THE FOX. 

THE Cat and the Fox were once talking together in the 
middle of a forest. " Let things be ever so bad," said 
Reynard, " I don't care ; I have a hundred shifts, if one 
should fail." " I," said the Cat, " have but one ; if that 
fails me I am undone." Just then a pack of Hounds burst 
into view. The Cat flew up a tree, and sat securely among 
the branches, and thence saw the Fox, after trying his 
hundred shifts in vain, overtaken by the Dogs and torn in 
pieces. 




2 5 



194 ^SOP'S FABLES. 



THE FOX, THE WOLF, AND THE HORSE. 

A Fox seeing a Horse for the first time, grazing in a field, 
at once ran to a Wolf of his acquaintance, and described the 
animal that he had found. " It is, perhaps," said the Fox, 
" some delicious prey that fortune has put in our path. 
Come with me, and judge for yourself." Off they ran, and 
soon came to the Horse, who, scarcely lifting his head, 
seemed little anxious to be on speaking terms with such 
suspicious-looking characters. " Sir," said the Fox, " your 
humble servants here would with pleasure learn the name 
by which you are known to your illustrious friends." The 
Horse, who was not without a ready wit, said his name was 
there curiously written upon his hoofs for the information 
of those who cared to read it. " Gladly would I," replied 
the sly Fox, suspecting in an instant something wrong, 
" but my parents were poor, and could not pay for my 
education ; hence, I never learned to read. The friends of 
my companion here, on the contrary, are great folk, and he 
can both read and write, and has a thousand other accom 
plishments." The Wolf, pleased with the flattery, at once 
went up, with a knowing air, to examine one of the hoofs 
which the Horse raised for his convenience ; and when 
he had come near enough, the Horse gave a sudden and 
vigorous kick, and back to earth fell the Wolf, his jaw broken 
and bleeding. " Well, cousin," cried the Fox, with a grin, 
" you need never ask for the name a second time, now that 
you have it written so plainly just below your eyes." 



THE MASTER AND HIS SCHOLAR. 



THE MASTER AND HIS SCHOLAR. 

As a Schoolmaster was walking upon the bank of a river, 
not far from his School, he heard a cry, as of some one 
in distress. Running to the side of the river, he saw one 
of his Scholars in the water, hanging by the bough of a 
willow. The Boy, it seems, had been learning to swim 
with corks, and fancying that he could now do without 
them, had thrown them aside. The force of the stream 
hurried him out of his depth, and he would certainly have 
been drowned, had not the friendly branch of a willow hung 
in his way. The Master took up the corks, which were 
lying upon the bank, and threw them to his Scholar. " Let 
this be a warning to you," said he, " and in your future life 
never throw away your corks until you are quite sure you 
have strength and experience enough to swim without 
them." 




196 sEsop's FABLES. 



THE FROG AND THE FOX. 

A FROG came out of his native marsh, and, hopping off to 
the top of a mound of earth, gave out to all the beasts 
around that he was a great physician, and could heal all 
manner of diseases. The Fox demanded why, if he was 
so clever, he did not mend his own blotched and spotted 
body, his stare eyes, and his lantern jaws. 



THE MAN AND THE STONE. 

was sent one day by his master Xanthus to see what 
company were at the public bath. He saw that many who 
came stumbled, both going in and coming out, over a large 
Stone that lay at the entrance to the bath, and that only one 
person had the good sense to remove it. He returned and 
told his master that there was only one Man at the bath. 
Xanthus accordingly went, and finding it full of people, 
demanded of ^Esop why he had told him false. ^Esop 
thereupon replied that only he who had removed the Stone 
could be considered a man, and that the rest were not 
worthy the name. 




THE FROG AND THE FOX. 



THE OlVL AND THE GRASSHOPPER. 199 



A COCK AND HORSES. 

A COCK once got into a stable, and went about nestling 
and scratching in the straw among the Horses, who 
every now and then would stamp and fling out their 
heels. So the Cock gravely set to work to admonish 
them. " Pray, my good friends, let us have a care," said 
he, "that we don't tread on one another." 



THE OWL AND THE GRASSHOPPER. 

AN Owl who was sitting in a hollow tree, dozing away a 
long summer's afternoon, was very much disturbed by a 
rogue of a Grasshopper singing in the grass beneath. So 
far indeed from keeping quiet, or moving away at the re 
quest of the Owl, the Grasshopper sang all the more, and 
called her an old blinker that only showed out at nights 
when all honest people were gone to bed. The Owl waited 
in silence for a short time, and then artfully addressed the 
Grasshopper as follows : " Well, my dear, if .one cannot be 
allowed to sleep, it is something to be kept awake by such 
a pleasant little pipe as yours, which makes most agreeable 
music, I must say. And now I think of it, my mistress 
Pallas gave me the other day a bottle of delicious nectar. 
If you will take the trouble to come up, you shall have a 
drop, and it will clear your voice nicely." The silly Grass 
hopper, beside himself with the flattery, came hopping up 
to the Owl. When he came within reach, the Owl caught 
him, killed him, and finished her nap in comfort. 



2OO 



&SOPS FABLES, 



THE DOG AND THE SHEEP. 

THE Dog sued the Sheep for a debt ; the Kite and the 
Wolf were the judges, and the Fox and the Vulture gave 
evidence. Judgment was given in favour of the plaintiff, 
and debt, costs, and expenses of witnesses were all paid out 
of the body of the poor Sheep. 



THE OLD WOMAN AND THE EMPTY CASK. 

AN Old Woman found an Empty Cask from which some 
choice old wine had lately been drawn off. She applied her 
noSe to the bung-hole, and sniffed long and eagerly. " Oh, 
how good must this wine have been ! " she exclaimed, 
" when the very dregs are so delicious/' 




THE SATYR AND THE TRAVELLER. 



201 




THE SATYR AND THE TRAVELLER. 

A SATYR, ranging in the forest in winter, came across a 
Traveller half starved with the cold. He took pity on him 
and invited him to go to his cave. On their way the Man 
kept blowing upon his fingers. "Why do you do that?" 
said the Satyr, who had seen little of the world. "To warm 
my hands, they are nearly frozen," replied the Man. Arrived 
at the cave, the Satyr poured out a mess of smoking pottage 
and laid it before the Traveller, who at once commenced 
blowing at it with all his might. " What, blowing again !" 
cried the Satyr. " Is it not hot enough?" "Yes, faith," 
answered the Man, "it is hot enough in all conscience, 
and that is just the reason why I blow at it." ".Be off 



202 sEsors FABLES. 



with you!" said the Satyr, in alarm; "I will have no 
part with a man who can blow hot and cold from the 
same mouth." 



JUPITER AND THE ANIMALS. 

JUPITER one day, being in great good-humour, called upon 
all living things to come before him, and if, looking at 
themselves and at one another, there should be in the 
appearance of any one of them anything which admitted of 
improvement, they were to speak of it without fear. " Come, 
Master Ape," said he, " you shall speak first. Look around 
you, and then say, are you satisfied with your good looks?" 
" I should think so," answered the Ape ; " and have I not 
reason? If I were like my brother the Bear, now, I might 
have something to say." " Nay," growled the Bear, " I 
don't see that there's much to find fault with in me ; but if 
you could manage to lengthen the tail and trim the ears of 
our friend the Elephant, that might be an improvement." 
The Elephant, in his turn, said that he had always con 
sidered the Whale a great deal too big to be comely. The 
Ant thought the Mite so small as to he beneath notice. 
Jupiter became angry to witness so much conceit, and sent 
them all about their business. 



TRAVELLERS BY THE SEA-SIDE. 203 



THE YOUNG MEN AND THE COOK. 

Two Young Men went into a Cook's shop, under pretence 
of buying meat. While the Cook's back was turned, one 
of them snatched up a piece of beef, and gave it to his 
companion, who put it under his cloak. The Cook turning 
round again, missed the meat, and charged them with the 
theft. " I haven't got it," said he who had taken it. " I've 
taken none of your meat," said he that had it. " Look here," 
said the Cook, " which of you has stolen my meat, I can't 
say ; but of this I'm sure between you both there's a thief 
and a couple of rascals." 



TRAVELLERS BY THE SEA-SIDE. 

A PARTY of Travellers, who were journeying along by the 
side of the Sea, saw in the offing something that in the 
hazy atmosphere loomed large like a vessel. She ap 
peared to be drifting towards the shore, and they deter 
mined to wait until she should be stranded. After some 
time, when the object had come nearer in shore, they 
fancied that it looked more like a boat than a ship. 
They waited some time longer, and at last found, to their 
disappointment, that what they had at first taken for an 
abandoned vessel, and then for a boat, was nothing but 
a floating mass of planks and sea-weed. 



204 A? SOP'S FABLES. 



THE MULE LADEN WITH CORN, AND THE 
MULE LADEN WITH GOLD. 

Two Mules were being driven along a lonely road. One 
was laden with Corn, and the other with Gold. The 
one that carried the Gold was so proud of his burden 
that, although it was very heavy, he would not for the 
world have the least bit of it taken away. He trotted 
along with stately step, his bells jingling as he went. 
By-and-by, some Robbers fell upon them. They let the 
Mule that carried the Corn go free ; but they seized the 
Gold which the other carried, and, as he kicked and 
struggled to prevent their robbing him, they stabbed 
him to the heart. In dying, he said to the other Mule, 
" I see, brother, it is not always well to have grand 
duties to perform. If, like you, I had only served a 
Miller, this sad state would not now be mine/' 



THE WOLF AND THE MASTIFF. 

A WOLF, who was almost skin and bone so well did 
the dogs of the neighbourhood keep guard met, one 
moonshiny night, a sleek Mastiff, who was, moreover, as 
strong as he was fat. The Wolf would gladly have 
supped off him, but saw there would first be a great 
fight, for which, in his condition, he was not prepared ; 
so, bidding the Dog good-night very humbly, he praised 




THE WOLF AND THE MASTIFF. 



THE WOLF AND THE MASTIFF. 207 



his good looks. " It would be easy for you," replied 
the Mastiff, " to get as fat as I am, if you liked. Quit 
this forest, where you and your fellows live so wretchedly, 
and often die with hunger. Follow me, and you shall 
fare much better." " What shall I have to do?" asked 
the Wolf. " Almost nothing," answered the Dog; "only 
chase away the beggars, and fawn upon the folks of the 
house. You will, in return, be paid with all sorts of 
nice things bones of fowls and pigeons to say nothing 
of many a friendly pat on the head." The Wolf, at the 
picture of so much comfort, nearly shed tears of joy. 
They trotted off together, but, as they went along, the 
Wolf noticed a bare spot on the Dog's neck. " What 
is that mark?" said he. "Oh, nothing," said the Dog. 
"How nothing?" urged the Wolf. "Oh, the merest 
trifle," answered the Dog; "the collar which I wear 
when I am tied up is the cause of it." "Tied up!" 
exclaimed the Wolf, with a sudden stop ; " tied up ! 
Can you not always, then, run where you please?" 
"Well, not quite always," said the Mastiff; "but what 
can that matter?" "It matters so much to me," re 
joined the Wolf, " that your lot shall not be mine at 
any price;" and leaping away, he ran once more to his 
native forest. 



208 



^ SOP'S FABLES. 



THE TWO TRAVELLERS AND THE OYSTER. 

As two Men were walking by the sea-side at low water, 
they saw an Oyster, and they both stooped at the same 
time to pick it up. One pushed the other away, and a 
dispute ensued. A third Traveller coming along at the 
time, they determined to refer the matter to him, which 
of the two had the better right to the Oyster. While 
they were each telling his story, the Arbitrator gravely 
took out his knife, opened the shell, and loosened the 
Oyster. When they had finished, and were listening for 
his decision, he just as gravely swallowed the Oyster, 
and offered them each a Shell. "The Court," said he, 
" awards you each a Shell. The Oyster will cover the 
costs." 




THE Ass IN THE LroN's SKIN. 



209 




THE ASS IN THE LION'S SKIN. 

AN Ass finding the skin of a Lion, put it on, and in that 
disguise spread terror through all the neighbourhood round. 
His master, however, spying his long ears, and recognising 
his voice, took a stout cudgel, and soon made him sensible 
that he was no more than an Ass. 




210 s SOP'S FABLES. 



THE YOUNG MOUSE, THE COCK, AND 

THE CAT. 

A YOUNG MOUSE, on his return to his hole after leaving 
it for the first time, thus recounted his adventures to his 
mother : " Mother," said he, " quitting this narrow place 
where you have brought me up, I rambled about to-day 
like a Young Mouse of spirit, who wished to see and to be 
seen, when two such notable creatures came in my way! 
One was so gracious, so gentle and benign ! the other, 
who was just as noisy and forbidding, had on his head 
and under his chin, pieces of raw meat, which shook 
at every step he took ; and then, all at once, beating his 
sides with the utmost fury, he uttered such a harsh and 
piercing cry that I fled in terror ; and this, too, just as 
I was about to introduce myself to the other stranger, 
who was covered with fur like our own, only richer-looking 
and much more beautiful, and who seemed so modest and 
benevolent that it did my heart good to look at her." 
"Ah, my son," replied the Old Mouse, "learn while you 
live to distrust appearances. The first strange creature 
was nothing but a Fowl, that will ere long be killed, and 
off his bones, when put on a dish in the pantry, we may 
make a delicious supper ; while the other was a nasty, 
sly, and bloodthirsty hypocrite of a Cat, to whom no 
food is so welcome as a young and juicy little Mouse like 
yourself." 



THE MAID AND THE PAIL OF MILK, 



21 I 



THE MAID AND THE PAIL OF MILK. 
DOLLY, the Milkmaid, having been a good girl for a long 
time, and careful in her work, her mistress gave her a 
Pail of New Milk for herself. With the Pail on her 
head, she was tripping gaily along to the house of the 
doctor, who was going to give a large party, and wanted 
the Milk for a junket. " For this Milk I shall get a 
shilling," said Dolly, "and with that shilling I shall 
buy twenty of the eggs laid by our neighbour's fine 
fowls. These eggs I shall put under mistress's old hen, 
and if only half of the chicks grow up and thrive before 
the next fair time comes round, I shall be able to sell 
them for a good guinea. Then I shall buy that jacket 
I saw in the village the other day, and a hat and ribbons 
too, and when I go to the fair how smart I shall be ! 
Robin will be there, for certain, and he will come up and 
offer to be friends again. I won't come round so easily, 
though ; and when he tries to kiss me, I shall just toss 

up my head and " Here Dolly gave her head the 

toss she was thinking about. Down came the Pail, and 
the Milk ran out on the ground ! Good-bye now to 
eggs, chicken, jacket, hat, ribbons, and all ! 




212 sEsop's FABLES. 



THE THIEF AND THE DOG. 

A THIEF who came near a house one night to rob it, was 
very much annoyed at finding a stout Dog in the courtyard, 
who kept up a loud and steady bark. To quiet him he 
threw him a tempting piece of meat, whereupon the Dog 
exclaimed, " When first you came, I fancied you might be 
a Thief: now that you try to bribe me from my duty, I 
am sure you are one ; and I shan't leave off barking while 
you remain about the premises." 



HERCULES AND PALLAS. 

HERCULES once journeying along a narrow roadway, came 
across a strange-looking animal, that reared its head and 
threatened him. Nothing daunted, the hero gave him a few 
lusty blows with his club, and thought to have gone on 
his way. The monster however, much to the astonishment 
of Hercules, was now three times as big as it was before, 
and of a still more threatening aspect. He thereupon re 
doubled his blows and laid about him fast and furiously; 
but the harder and quicker the strokes of the club, the 
bigger and more frightful grew the monster, and now com 
pletely filled up the road. Pallas then appeared upon the 
scene. " Stop, Hercules," said she. " Cease your blows. 
The monster's name is Strife. Let it alone, and it will 
soon become as little as it was at first.' 




THE THIEF AND THE DOG. 



THE FALCON AND THE CAPON. 215 



THE TAIL OF THE SERPENT. 

THE Tail of a Serpent once rebelled against the Head, and 
said that it was a great shame that one end of any animal 
should always have its way, and drag the other after it, 
whether it was willing or no. It was in vain that the Head 
urged that the Tail had neither brains nor eyes, and that 
it was in no way made to lead. Wearied by the Tail's im 
portunity, the Head one day let him have his will. The 
Serpent now went backwards for a long time, quite gaily, 
until he came to the edge of a high cliff, over which both 
Head and Tail went flying, and came with a heavy thump 
on the shore beneath. The Head was never again troubled 
by the Tail with a word about leading. 



THE FALCON AND THE CAPON. 

A CAPON who had strong reasons for thinking that the time 
of his sacrifice was near at hand, carefully avoided coming 
into close quarters with any of the farm servants or 
domestics of the estate on which he lived. A glimpse 
that he had once caught of the kitchen, with its blazing fire, 
and the head cook, like an executioner, with a formidable 
knife, chopping off the heads of some of his companions, had 
been sufficient to keep him ever after in dread. Hence, one 
day when he was wanted for roasting, all the calling, 
clucking, and coaxing of the cook's assistants were in vain. 



2i6 SSOP'S FABLES. 



" How deaf and dull you must be/' said a Falcon to the 
Capon, " not to hear when you are called, or to see when 
you are wanted ! You should take pattern by me. I never 
let my master call me twice." " Ah," answered the Capon, 
" if Falcons were called, like Capons, to be run upon a spit 
and set before the kitchen fire, they would be just as slow 
to come, and just as hard of hearing, as I am now." 



THE HARE AFRAID OF HIS EARS. 

THE Lion being once badly hurt by the horns of a Goat, 
went into a great rage, and swore that every animal with 
horns should be banished from his kingdom. Goats,. Bulls, 
Rams, Deer, and every living thing with horns had quickly 
to be off on pain of death. A Hare, seeing from his shadow 
how long his ears were, was in great fear lest they should 
be taken for horns. " Good-bye, my friend," said he to a 
Cricket who, for many a long summer evening, had chirped 
to him where he lay dozing : " I must be off from here. My 
ears are too much like horns to allow me to be comfortable." 
"Horns!" exclaimed the Cricket, "do you take me for a 
fool? You no more have horns than I have." " Say what 
you please," replied the Hare, "were my ears only half as 
long as they are, they would be quite long .enough for any 
one to lay hold of who wished to make them out to be 
horns." 




THE CROW AND THE PITCHER. 



217 




THE CROW AND THE PITCHER. 

A CROW, ready to die with thirst, flew with joy to a Pitcher 
hoping to find some water in it. He found some there, to 
be sure, but only a little drop at the bottom, which he was 
quite unable to reach. He then tried to overturn the 
Pitcher, but it was too heavy. So he gathered up some 
pebbles, with which the ground near was covered, and, 
taking them one by one in his beak, dropped them into the 
Pitcher. By this means the water gradually reached the 
top, and he was able to drink at his ease. 



218 ^ SOP'S FABLES. 



THE WOLF AND THE FOX. 

SAID the Fox to the Wolf, one day, " My friend, you have 
no idea how badly I often fare. A horribly tough old 
Cock, or a lean and shrivelled Hen, is a kind of food of 
which it is quite possible in time to get tired. Now, it 
seems to me that you live a good deal better than we 
do, and don't run into so much danger either. I have 
to go prowling about the houses : you get your prey in 
the fields afar. Teach me your business. Let me be the 
first of my race to have a fat Sheep whenever he has a 
fancy that way. Teach me, there's a good fellow, and 
you shall find yourself no loser in the end." " I will," 
said the Wolf; and, by-the-by, I have just lost a brother. 
You will find his body over yonder. Slip into his skin, 
and come to me again." The Fox did as he was told, 
and the Wolf gave him many a lesson in growling, biting, 
fighting, and deportment, which the Fox executed first 
badly, then fairly, and in the end quite as well as his 
master. Just then a flock of Sheep came in sight, and 
into the midst of them rushed the new-made Wolf, with 
such fury and noise that Shepherd Boy, Dog, and Sheep 
flew off in terror to gain their home, leaving only one 
poor sheep behind, that had been seized by the throat. 
Just at that instant, a Cock in the nearest farm crowed 
loud and shrill. There was no resisting the familiar 
sound. Out of the Wolf's skin slipped the Fox, and 
made towards the Cock as fast as he could, forgetting in 



THE EAGLE AND THE MAN. 219 

a moment, his lessons, the Sheep, the Professor, and every 
thing else, about which he had just been making all the 
fuss in the world. 



THE EAGLE AND THE MAN. 
A MAN caught an Eagle in a snare. He cut his win<rs 

o o o 

close, and kept him chained to a stump in his yard. A 
kind-hearted Fowler, seeing the melancholy-looking bird, 
took pity on him, and bought him. He was now well 
treated, and his wings were allowed to grow. When they 
had grown again sufficiently for him to fly, the Fowler 
gave him his liberty. The first thing the Bird caught was 
a fine fat Hare, which he brought and gratefully laid at 
the feet of his benefactor. A Fox, looking on, said that he 
would have done better to try to make friends with the 
first Man who had caught him, and who might perhaps 
catch him yet again, rather than with the second, from 
whom he had nothing to fear. "Your advice may do very 
well for a Fox," replied the Eagle ; " but it is my nature to 
serve those who have been kind to me, and to let those 
who choose be governed by fear." 




220 sfzsop's FABLES. 



THE CROW AND THE MUSSEL. 

A CROW having found a Mussel on the sea-shore, took 
it in his beak, and tried for a long time to break the 
shell by hammering it upon a stone. Another Crow a 
sly old fellow came and watched him for some time in 
silence. " Friend," said he at last, " you'll never break 
it in that way. Listen to me. This is the way to do it : 
Fly up as high as you can, and let the tiresome thing 
fall upon a rock. It will be smashed then, sure enough, 
and you can eat it at your leisure." The simple-minded 
and unsuspecting Crow did as he was told, flew up and 
let the Mussel fall. Before he could descend to eat it, 
however, the other bird had pounced upon it and carried 
it away. 



THE LION AND THE FOUR BULLS. 

FOUR Bulls were such great friends that they used always 
when feeding to keep together. A Lion watched them for 
many days with longing eyes, but never being able to find 
one apart from the rest, was afraid to attack them. He at 
length succeeded in awakening a jealousy among them, 
which ripened into a mutual aversion, and they strayed off 
at a considerable distance from each other. The Lion then 
fell upon them singly, and killed them all. 




THE LION AND THE FOUR BULLS. 



THE SHEPHERD AND THE YOUNG WOLF. 223 



THE BEAR AND THE FOX. 

THE Bear is said to be unwilling to touch the dead body of 
a man ; and one of the animals was once heard making 
a virtue of this peculiarity. " Such is my regard for man 
kind," said he, " that nothing on earth would induce me 
to injure a human corpse." " Your kindness would impress 
me much more," said a Fox who was listening to this 
speech, " if I could believe that you paid the same respect 
to the living that you profess to do to the dead." 



THE SHEPHERD AND THE YOUNG WOLF. 

A SHEPHERD found the young Cub of a Wolf, and caused 
it to be brought up among his Dogs, with whom it grew 
to be quite friendly. When any other Wolves came, 
meaning to rob the fold, this young fellow was among the 
foremost to give them chase, but on returning he generally 
managed to linger behind the Dogs, and keep a sharp look 
out for any stray Sheep from the fold. Instead, however, 
of bringing these home, he would drive them to an out- 
of-the-way spot, and there mangle and partially devour 
them. He did this once too often, and was caught at it 
by the Shepherd, who quickly set him hanging by the 
neck from the bough of a tree, and in that way put an end 
to his double-dealing. 



224 



^ SOP'S FABLES. 



THE EAGLE AND THE OWL. 

THE Eagle and the Owl, after many quarrels, swore that 
they would be fast friends for ever, and that they would 
never harm each other's young ones. " But do you know 
my little ones?" said the Owl. "If you do not, I fear 
it will go hard with them when you find them." " Nay, 
then, I do not," replied the Eagle. " The greater your loss," 
said the Owl ; " they are the sweetest, prettiest things in 
the world. Such dear eyes ! such charming plumage ! such 
winning little ways ! You'll know them, now, from my 
description." A short time after, the Eagle found the little 
ones in a hollow tree. " These hideous little staring frights, 
at any rate, cannot be neighbour Owl's delicious pets," said 
the Eagle ; " so I may make away with them without the 
least misgiving." The Owl, finding her young ones gone, 
loaded the Eagle with reproaches. " Nay," answered the 
Eagle, " blame yourself rather than me. If you paint with 
such flattering colours, it is not my fault if I do not recognise 
your portraits." 




THE MERRY- ANDREW AND THE COUNTRYMAN. 225 




THE MERRY-ANDREW AND THE COUNTRY 
MAN. 

ON the occasion of some festivities that were given by a 
Roman nobleman, a droll fellow of a Merry-andrew caused 
much laughter by his tricks upon the stage, and, more 
than all, by his imitation of the squeaking of a Pig. It 
seemed to the hearers so real, that they called for it again 
and again. One man, however, in the audience, thought the 
imitation was not perfect; and he made his way to the 
stage, and said that if he were permitted, he to-morrow 
would enter the lists, and squeak against the Merry-andrew 
for a wager. The mob, anticipating great fun, shouted their 
consent, and accordingly, when the next day came, the two 
rival Jokers were in their place. The hero of the previous 
day went first, and the hearers, more pleased than ever, 



226 /Esops FABLES. 



fairly roared with delight. Then came the turn of the 
Countryman, who, having a Pig carefully concealed under 
his cloak, so that no one would have suspected its exist 
ence, vigorously pinched its ear with his thumb-nail, and 
made it squeak with a vengeance. " Not half as good 
not half as good !" cried the audience, and many among 
them even began to hiss. " Fine judges you !" replied the 
Countryman, rushing to the front of the stage, drawing the 
Pig from under his cloak, and holding the animal up on 
high. " Behold the performer that you condemn !" 



THE HARE AND THE DOG. 

A DOG once gave a long chase to a Hare. The Dog 
having not long since made a good meal, was not at all 
hungry, and in consequence in no hurry to put an end 
to the sport. He would at times, as they ran, snap at 
the Hare, and at others lick him with his tongue. " Pray," 
cried the persecuted and bewildered Hare, " are you a 
friend or an enemy? If a friend, why do you bite me 
so ? and if an enemy, why caress me ? " . 



THE OLD MAN, HIS SON, AND THE Ass. 



227 




THE OLD MAN, HIS SON, AND THE ASS. 

AN Old Man and his little Boy were once driving an Ass 
before them to the next market-town, where it was to be 
sold. " Have you no more wit," said a passer-by, " than 
for you and your Son to trudge on foot, and let your 
Ass go light?" So the Man put his Boy on the Ass, and 
they went on again. "You lazy young rascal!" said the 
next person they met ; " are you not ashamed to ride, and 
let your poor old Father go on foot ?" The Man lifted off 
the Boy, and got up himself. Two women passed soon 
after, and one said to the other, " Look at that selfish old 
fellow, riding on, while his little Son follows after on 
foot!" The Old Man thereupon took up the Boy behind 
him. The next traveller they met asked the Old Man 



228 sE SOP'S FABLES. 



whether or not the Ass was his own. Being answered that 
it was : " No one would think so," said he, " from the way 
in which you use it. Why, you are better able to carry the 
poor animal than he is to carry both of you." So the Old 
Man tied the Ass's legs to a long pole, and he and his Son 
shouldered the pole, and staggered along under the weight. 
In that fashion they entered the town, and their appearance 
caused so much laughter, that the Old Man, mad with 
vexation at the result of his endeavours to give satisfaction 
to everybody, threw the Ass into the river, and seizing his 
Son by the arm, went his way home again. 



THE OLD LION. 

A LION, worn-out with age, lay drawing his last breath, 
and several of the beasts who had formerly been sufferers 
by him came and revenged themselves. The Boar, with 
his powerful tusks, ripped his flank ; and the Bull gored 
his sides with his horns. The Ass, too, seeing there was 
no danger, came up and threw his heels into the Lion's 
face. Thereupon, the poor old expiring tyrant, with his 
dying groan, uttered these words : " How much worse than 
a thousand deaths it is to be spurned by so base a creature. 




6. .. J \ & % 




THE OLD LION. 



Two TRAVELLERS OF DIFFERING HUMOURS, 231 



THE CAT AND THE SPARROWS. 

A GREAT friendship existed between a Sparrow and a Cat, 
to whom, when quite a kitten, the bird had been given. 
The Sparrow would fly into little mimic rages, and peck the 
Cat with his bill, while Pussy would beat him off with only 
half-opened claws ; and though this sport would often wax 
warm, there was never real anger between them. It hap 
pened, however, that the bird made the acquaintance of 
another Sparrow, and being both of them saucy fellows, 
they soon fell out and quarrelled in earnest. The little 
friend of the Cat, in these fights, generally fared the worst ; 
and one day he came trembling all over with passion, and 
besought the Cat to avenge his wrongs for him. Pussy 
thereupon pounced on the offending stranger, and speedily 
crunched him up and swallowed him. " I had no idea 
before that Sparrows were so nice/' said the Cat to herself, 
whose blood was now stirred ; and as quick as thought her 
little playmate was seized and sent to join his enemy. 



TWO TRAVELLERS OF DIFFERING HUMOURS. 

THERE were two Men together upon a journey, of very 
different humours. One went despondingly on, with a 
thousand cares and troubles in his head, exclaiming every 
now and then, " Whatever shall I do to live I" The other 



232 sE SOP'S FABLES. 



jogged merrily along, determined to keep a good heart, to 
do his best, and leave the issue to Fortune. " How can 
you be so merry?" said the Sorrowful wight. " As I am a 
sinner, my heart is ready to break, for fear I should want 
bread/' And then, shortly after, said he, " What a dreadful 
thing it would be if I were struck blind!" and he must 
needs walk on ahead with his eyes shut, to try how it would 
seem if that misfortune should befal him. His Fellow- 
traveller, coming after him, picked up a purse of gold which 
he, having his eyes shut, had not perceived ; and thus \vas 
he punished for his mistrust, for the purse had been his if 
he had not first willingly put it out of his power to see it. 



THE FIR-TREE AND THE BRAMBLE. 

THE Fir-tree treated with contempt the Bramble that grew 
at its foot. " I am put to many high and noble uses," said 
he boastfully. " I furnish taper spars for ships, and beams 
for the roofs of palaces. You are trodden under foot, and 
despised by everybody." " You talk very finely now," 
replied the Bramble ; " but, for all that, when once you feel 
the axe applied to your root, you'll wish you had been a 
Bramble." 




THE FIR-TREE AND THE BRAMBLE. 



THE WOLF AND THE LION. 235 



THE HORSE AND THE GROOM. 

A DISHONEST Groom used regularly to sell a good half of 
the measure of oats that was daily allowed for a Horse, 
the care of which was entrusted to him. He would, how 
ever, keep currying the animal for hours together, to make 
him appear in good condition. The Horse naturally re 
sented this treatment. " If you really wish me to look 
sleek," said he, " in future give me half the currying, and 
leave off selling half my food." 



THE WOLF AND THE LION. 

A WOLF and a Lion were abroad on an adventure to 
gether. "Hark! sir," said the Wolf, "don't you hear the 
bleating of Sheep? My life for yours but I'll go and 
bring you something worth while." Off he ran towards 
the place whence the bleating came, till he arrived near 
enough to see the Shepherds and Dogs all alert and 
on their guard. Back he came sneaking to the Lion 
again. "Well?" said the Lion, with a contemptuous 
glance. "Why," answered the Wolf, "they are Sheep 
yonder, it is true, but they are lank as Hounds. We 
may as well wait till they have some more flesh on their 
bones/' 



236 ^L SOP'S FABLES. 



THE EAGLE AND THE ARROW. 

AN Archer once feathered an Arrow with a feather that had 
fallen from an Eagle's wing. It shortly afterwards hap 
pened that with this Arrow he shot the very Eagle that had 
cast the feather. In her mortal agony the Eagle recognised 
her property, and exclaimed, " Bitter is it to die, but doubly 
bitter to find that I have helped to speed the means of 
death!" 



THE NURSE AND THE WOLF. 

As a Wolf was hunting up and down for his supper, he 
passed by the door of a house where a little child was 
crying loudly. " Hold your tongue," said the Nurse to 
the child, "or I'll throw you to the Wolf." The Wolf, 
hearing this, waited near the house, expecting that she 
would keep her word. The Nurse, however, when the child 
was quiet, changed her tone, and said, " If the naughty 
Wolf comes now we'll beat his brains out for him." The 
Wolf thought it was then high time to be off, and went 
away grumbling at his folly in putting faith in the words 
of a woman. 




THE NURSE AND THE WOLF. 



HERCULES AND PLUTUS. 239 



THE TRAVELLERS AND THE CROW. 

SOME Travellers setting out on a journey had not pro 
ceeded far, when a one-eyed Crow flew across their path. 
This they took for a bad omen, and it was proposed that 
they should give up their plan for that day, at least, and 
turn back again. " What nonsense !" said one of the 
Travellers, who was of a mocking and merry disposition. 
" If this Crow could foresee what is to happen to us, he 
would be equally knowing on his own account ; and in that 
case, do you think he would have been silly enough to go 
where his eye was to be knocked out of his head?" 



HERCULES AND PLUTUS. 

WHEN Hercules was raised to the dignity of a god, and 
took his place on Olympus, he went round and paid his 
respects to all the gods and goddesses, excepting only the 
God of Wealth, to whom he made no sign. This caused 
much astonishment, and Jupiter, at the first favourable 
opportunity, asked Hercules for an explanation. "Why/' 
answered he, "I have seen that god in the company of 
such rascals when on earth, that I did not know whether it 
would be considered reputable to be seen talking to him in 
heaven." 



240 



sE SOP'S FABLES. 



THE ANT AND THE CHRYSALIS. 

AN Ant nimbly running about in the sunshine in search 
of food, came across a Chrysalis that was very near its 
time of change. The Chrysalis moved its tail, and thus 
attracted the attention of the Ant, who then saw for the 
first time that it was alive. " Poor, pitiable animal !" cried 
the Ant disdainfully ; " what a sad fate is yours ! While I 
can run hither and thither, at my pleasure, and, if I wish,, 
ascend the tallest tree, you lie imprisoned here in your 
shell, with power only to move a joint or two of your scaly 
tail." The Chrysalis heard all this, but did not try to make 
any reply. A few days after, when the Ant passed that w^ay 
again, nothing but the shell remained. Wondering what 
had become of its contents, he felt himself suddenly shaded 
and fanned by the gorgeous wings of a beautiful Butterfly. 
"Behold in me," said the Butterfly, "your much-pitied 
friend ! Boast now of your powers to run and climb as long 
as you can get me to listen." So saying, the Butterfly rose 
in the air, and, borne along and aloft on the summer breeze, 
was soon lost to the sight of the Ant for ever. 




INDEX OF CONTENTS. 



and Basket of Bread 
and the Tongues 

ysop at Play 

yEsop, Stone, and the Man 

Angler and Little Fish 

Ant and Chrysalis 

Ant and Fly 

Ants and the Grasshopper 

Ape and Dolphin 

Ape and Two Young Ones 

Ape, Ass, and Mole 

Ape (King) and Fox 

Ape, Wolf, and Fox 

Apple, Peach, and Blackberry... 

Arrow and Eagle ... 

Ass and Boar 

Ass and Boar (Challenge) 

Ass and Horse 

Ass and Jupiter 

Ass and Lion Hunting ... 

Ass and Little Dog 

Ass and Wolves ... 

Ass, Ape, and Mole 

Ass Carrying an Idol 

Ass Eating Thistles 

Ass, Dog, and Wolf 

Ass in the Lion's Skin 

Ass (Laden) and Horse 

Ass Laden with Salt and with Sponge 

Ass, Lion, and Cock 

Ass, Lion, and Fox 

Ass, Lion, and Fox ... 

Ass (Lion's Skin) and Fox ... 

Ass, Old Man, and Boy 

Ass (Sick) and Wolves 

Ass, The Sensible 

Asses and Hares 

Ass's Shadow 



Bald Knight 

Bat and Two Weasels 

Bat, Birds, and Beasts ... 
Bear and Bee-hives 

Bear and Fox 

Beaver, the Hunted 

Bee and Jupiter... 
Bees, Drones, and Wasp 
Belly and the Members 

Birds, Beasts, and Bat 

Blackamoor, The 

Blackberry, Apple, and Peach... 

Blackbird and Fowler 

Boar and Ass 

Boar and Ass (Challenge) 



1 68 

175 

60 

196 

129 

240 

9 

H5 
191 

138 

183 

65 

39 

120 

236 

81 
1 88 

74 

87 
188 

42 
156 
183 
155 
119 

64 
209 
119 
114 



154 
170 
194 
148 
105 
104 
159 

16 
179 

75 
140 
223 

58 
179 
127 

15 

75 
130 
1 20 

H3 

81 

1 88 



Boar and Fox 
Boasting Traveller 
Boy and Fortune 

Boy and Thief 

Boy, Old Man, and Ass 
Boy-thief and his Mother 
Bramble and Fir Tree ... 
Bramble and Fox 
Brother and Sister 

Bull and Gnat 

Bull and Goat 



Caesar and the Slave* 

Calf, The Wanton 

Capon and Falcon 
Carver and Mercury 

Cat and Cock 

Cat and Fox 

Cat and Sow 

Cat and Sparrows 

Cat and the Mice 

Cat and- Young Man 

Cat, Cock, and Young Mouse ... 
Cat, Eagle, and Sow 

Cats and Mice 

Chrysalis and Ant 

Cock and Cat 

Cock and Fox 

Cock and Fox (in Trap) 

Cock and Jewel ... 

Cock and Thieves 

Cock, Lion, and Ass 

Cocks and Partridge 

Cocks Fighting ... 

Collier and Fuller 

Cook and Young Men 

Countryman and Fox 

Countryman and Merry Andrew 
Countryman and Snake 
Countryman and Wood (Axe-ha-ndle) 

Courtship, The Fatal 

Covetous Man 

Covetous Man and the Envious 

Crabs, The Two 

Crane and Peacock ... ... 

Crane and Wolf ... 
Cranes and Geese ... 

Creaking Wheel 

Crow and Eagle 

Crow and Fox 
Crow and Mussel 
Crow and Pitcher 
Crow and Travellers 
Cupid and Death 



PAGE 

116 

24 
48 

63 
194 

40 

232 

47 

23 

112 

49 

36 

25 
215 

135 
73 

193 
39 

231 

7 
106 

210 

32 
152 

240 

73 

132 

171 

4 



58 



203 
60 

225 
17 
55 
23 

124 
81 
44 
49 
28 
76 

7i 
1 08 
i To 

220 

217 

239 

52 





242 INDEX 


OF CONTENTS. 




Death and Old Man 
Death and Cupid 
Deer and Lion ... 


PAGE 
121 

52 

160 

122 

63 
I6 3 
226 

200 

9 
1 60 

42 

212 
6 4 

73 
146 

50 

20 

43 
191 

57 
104 

127 

120 

236 
1 08 
8 4 
140 
219 
224 

44 
32 
H7 
81 

66 
215 
84 
87 
23 
50 
47 
232 
128 
129 
56 
48 

154 
178 
220 

U3 
169 
104 
65 
170 
223 
116 
47 
193 
132 
60 
1 80 
84 


Fox and Frog 


PAGE 
196 


Fox and Goat 
Fox and Grapes 


34 


Doctor and Old Woman 
Doe, One-Eyed ... 


Fox and Hedgehog 
Fox and Hen 


... 192 
161 


Dog and Gardener 
Dog and Hare 


Fox and Leopard 
Fox and Lion 


1UJ 

... 25 

rgr 


Dog and Sheep (Trial) 
Dog and Shadow 
Dog and Sheep ... 


Fox and Lioness 
Fox and Mask 


10 3 

... 34 

c r 


Fox and Sick Lion 
Fox and Stork 


... 41 

\\ 


Dog and the Ass 
Dog and Thief ... 


Fox and Tiger 




Dog, Ass, and Wolf 
Dog in the Manger 
Dog Invited to Supper ... 
Dog, Man bitten by 
Dog, Mischievous 
Dog (Sheep-biter) 
Dolphin and Ape 
Dolphin and Thunny 
Dove and Fowler 
Drones, Bees, and Wasp 
Drunken Husband 

Eagle and Arrow 
Eagle and Crow 


Fox and Wolf 


iy 
i A -i 


Fox and Wolf 


218 


Fox, Ass, and Lion 
Fox, Ass, and Lion 
Fox in the Well 


... 31 
... 154 
138 


Fox (in Trap) and Cock 
Fox, Lion, and Tiger 
Fox, Lion, and Wolf 
Fox without a Tail 
Fox, Wolf, and Ape 
Foxes and Man ... 


... 171 
... 52 

i35 

... 44 

... 39 

1 07 


Frog and Fox 


1 06 


Frog and Lion 


QC 


Frog and Mouse 
Frog and Mouse 


... 128 
l67 


Eagle and Fox 


Eagle and Husbandman 
Eagle and Man ... 


Frog, the Vain 


12 


Frogs and Fighting Bulls 
Frogs and Hares 
Frogs desiring a King ... 
Fuller and Collier 

Gardener and Dog 
Gardener and Landlord ... 
Geese and Cranes 
Generous Lion 


18 

... 27 

... 76 

... 31 

... 163 
... 185 
... 76 

M 


Eagle and Owl . 


Eagle and Tortoise ... ... ..." 
Eagle, Cat, and Sow ... 
Elephant and Lion 
Envious Man and the Covetous 

Fables, Power of 
Falcon and Capon ... 
Falconer and Partridge 
Farmer and Hawk 
Fatal Courtship ... . 
Fawn and Stag ... 


Gnat and Bull 


112 


Gnat and Lion ... ... ... 


148 


Gnat and Man ... 


164 


Goat and Bull 


4.Q 


File and Viper ... 


Goat and Fox 


74. 


Fir Tree and Bramble ... 
Fisherman and Troubled Water 
Fish (Little) and Angler 
Fish (River and Sea) ... 
Fortune and Boy 
Fortune and Ploughman 
Fortune Teller, The 
Four Bulls and Lion 
Fowler and Blackbird ... 
Fowler and Lark 
Fowler and Ringdove ... ... 
Fox and Ape (King) 
Fox and Ass (Lion's Skin) 
Fox and Bear 


Goat and Lion 


172 


Goat, Kid, and Wolf 
Goatherd and Goats 
Goatherd and She-Goat 
Goose (Golden Egg) and Man 
Gourd and Pine ... 


... 177 
... 6 7 
... 91 

... 48 
172 


Grasshopper and Ants ... 
Grasshopper and Locusts 
Groom and Horse 

Hare afraid of his Ears 
Hare and Dog 


... 145 
... 176 
- 235 

... 216 
226 


Hare and Hound 
Hare and Sparrow 
Hare and Tortoise 
Hares and Asses 
Hares and Frogs 
Harper, The 


... 130 
... 153 
... 115 
... 104 

... 27 
55 


Fox and Boar 


Fox and Bramble 
Fox and Cat 


Fox and Cock ... 


Fox and Countryman ... 
Fox and Crow 


Hart and Vine 


... 107 


Hawk and Farmer 
Hedgehog and Fox 


... 87 
... 192 


Fox and Eagle ... 







INDEX OF CONTENTS. 



243 





I'AGE 


Hen and Fox ... 


... 163 


Hen and Swallow 


... 127 


H en ( Fat) and Woman 


... 178 


Hercules and Wagoner 


... 75 


Hercules and Pallas 


... 212 


Hercules and Plutus 


239 


Herdsman and Jupiter ... 


... 151 


Hog and Horse 


... I8 7 


Horse and Ass ... 


... 74 


Horse and Groom 


... 235 


Horse and Hog 


... 187 


Horse and Laden Ass ... 


... 119 


Horse and Lion 


161 


Horse and Stag ... 


... .56 


Hound and Hare 


... 130 


Hound, The Old 


... 164 


Husbandman and Eagle 


... 140 


Husbandman and his Sons 


... 80 


Husbandman and Mattock 


... in 


Husbandman and Stork 


... 103 


Idol and Man 


... 137 


Jackdaw and Pigeons 


... 26 


Jackdaw and Sheep 


... 152 


Jackdaw, Vain ... 


... 57 


Jupiter and Ass 


... 87 


Jupiter and Bee ... 


... 179 


Jupiter and Camel 


2 


Jupiter and Herdsman ... 


... [51 


Jupiter and the Animals 


. . . 2O2 


Jupiter's Two Wallets ... 


... I8 7 


Kid and Wolf 


... I 5 6 


Kid and Wolf 


162 


Kid, Goat, and Wolf 


... 177 


Kite and Pigeons 


... 15 


Knight and his Charger 


139 


Landlord and Gardener 


... 185 


Lark and Fowler 


... I6 9 


Lark and Young Ones 


... 8 9 


Leopard and Fox 


... 25 


Lion and Ass Hunting ... 


... 1 88 


Lion and Deer ... 


1 60 


Lion and Elephant 


... 147 


Lion and Four Bulls 


... 220 


Lion and Fox 


... 185 


Lion and Frog 


- 95. 


Lion and Gnat 


148 


Lion and Horse ... 


161 


Lion and Man 


. 16 


Lion and Mouse 


20 


Lion and Wolf ... 


235 


Lion and Young Man ... 


169 


Lion, Ass, and Cock 


... 51 


Lion, Ass, and Fox 


... 31 


Lion, Asses, and Hares 


104 


Lion, Fox, and Ass 


... 154 


Lion, Fox, and Wolf 


... 135 


Lion Hunting with other Beasts 


2 


Lion in Love 


28 


Lion, The Generous 


... 35 



Lion (The Sick) and Fox 

Lion, Tiger, and Fox 
Lioness and Fox 
Locusts and Grasshopper 

Magpie and Peacock 

Maid and Pail of Milk 

Maid and Pail of Milk 

Man and Eagle 

Man and Foxes 

Man and Gnat ... 

Man and Goose 

Man and Lion 

Man and Stone ... 

Man and Serpent 

Man and Two Wives 

Man and Weasel 

Man and Wooden God 

Man bitten by Dog ... 

Man (Old) and Death 

Man (Old) and his Son5 

Mask and Fox ... 
Master and Scholar 

Mastiff and Wolf 

Mattock, The Lost 

Mercury and Carver ... 

Mercury and Woodman 

Merry Andrew and Countryman 

Mice and Cat 

Mice in Council 

Mole and her Dam 

Mole, Ape, and Ass 

Mountain in Labour 

Mouse and Frog 

Mouse and Frog 

Mouse and Lion 

Mouse and Weasel 

Mule, The 

Mules Laden with Corn and with Gold 
Mussel and Crow 

Nightingale and Hawk 

Nurse and Wolf 



Oak and the Reeds 

Old Lion 

Old Man, Boy, and Ass 

Old Man, his Son, and the Ass 

One-Eyed Doe 

Owl and Eagle ... 

Oxen and Butchers 

Oyster and Two Travellers 

Pallas and Hercules 

Partridge and Cocks 
Partridge and Falconer 
Peach, Apple, and Blackberry . . 

Peacock and Crane 

Peacock and Magpie 

Peacock's Complaint 

Pigeons and Jackdaw ... 

Pigeons and Kite 

Pitcher and Crow 



244 



INDEX OF CONTENTS. 



Ploughman and Fortune 154 

Plutus and Hercules ... ... ... 239 

Porcupine and Snakes ... 82 

Pots, The Two ... ... ... ... 43 

Power of Fables 66 



Rabbits, the Two 
Raven and Serpent 
Reeds and the Oak 
Rivers and Sea . 



Satyr and Traveller ... 20 1 

Scholar and Master ... ... ... 195 

Sea and Rivers ... ... 183 

Sensible Ass ... 105 

Serpent and Man ... 96 

Serpent and Raven ... 180 

Serpent's Tail 215 

Sheep and Dog ... ... 160 

Sheep and Dog (Trial) ... ... ... 200 

Sheep and Wolf ... ... ... ... 159 

Sheep and Wolves ... 106 

Sheep-biter ... ... 43 

Shepherd and Young Wolf ... ... 223 

Shepherd Boy and Wolf 96 

Shepherd turned Merchant ... ... 143 

Sick Kite ... 27 

Snake and Countryman 17 

Snakes and Porcupine ... 82 

Socrates and Friends ... ... ... 191 

Sow and Cat 39 

Sow and Wolf ... .... ... ... 100 

Sow, Eagle, and Cat 32 

Sparrow and Hare ... 153 

Sparrows and Cat ... 231 

Spendthrift and Swallow 24 

Stag and Fawn 50 

Stag and Horse ... ... ... ... 56 

Stag and the Pool 3 

Stag in the Ox-Stall 10 

Stag, The Sick ... ... 116 

Stone and Man ... ... ... ... 196 

Stork and Fox ... ... 33 

Stork and Husbandman ... ... 103 

Sun and Wind ... ... 19 

Swallow and Hen ... ... ... 127 

Swallow and other Birds 88 

Swallow and Thrush ... ... ... 103 

Tail (The) of the Serpent 215 

Thief and Boy . 63 

Thief and Dog 212 

Thieves and Cock 131 

Thrush and Swallow ... 103 

Thunny and Dolphin ... 57 

Tiger and Fox 59 

Tiger, Lion, and Fox 52 

Tongues, Feast of 175 

Tortoise and Eagle ... 44 



79 
1 80 

59 
183 



Tortoise and Hare 

Town Mouse and Country Mouse 

Traveller and Satyr 

Traveller, Boasting 
Travellers and Bear 

Travellers and Crow 

Travellers, The Two (finding an Axe) 

Travellers (Two) and Oyster 

Trumpeter taken Prisoner 

Two Frogs ... ... 

Two Travellers of Differing Humours 



Vine and Hart 
Viper and File 



| Wagoner and Hercules 

Wallets, The Two 

Wanton Calf 

Wasp, Bees, and Drones 
Weasel and Man 
Weasel and Mouse 

Weasels and Bat 

Wheel, Creaking 

Wind and Sun 

Wolf and Boy ... 

Wolf and Crane ... 

Wolf and Fox 

Wolf and Fox 

Wolf and Kid 

Wolf and Kid 

Wolf and Lamb 

Wolf and Lion ... 

Wolf and Mastiff 

Wolf and Nurse 

Wolf and Sheep 

Wolf in Sheep's Clothing 

Wolf and Sow 

Wolf, Ass, and Dog 

Wolf, Fox, and Ape 

Wolf, Goat, and Kid 

Wolves and Ass ... 
Wolves and Sheep 
Wolves and Sick Ass ... 
Woman and Drunken Husband 
Woman and Empty Cask 

Woman and Fat Hen 

Woman (Old) and Doctor 
Woman (Old) and her Maids ... 
Wood and Clown 
Woodman and Mercury 



97 

2OI 

24 

36 

239 

131 

208 

114 

I 

231 

107 

47 

75 
187 

25 
127 
124 

7i 
179 

7i 
19 
96 

28 

H3 
218 
156 
162 
4 

235 
204 

236 
159 

121 

IOO 

6 4 

39 
177 
156 
106 
148 
1 20 
200 
178 

122 
72 
52 
92 



Xanthus' Wager 183 



Young Man and his Cat 
Young Man and Lion ... 
Young Men and Cook ... 
Young Mouse, Cock, and Cat 
Young Shepherd and Wolf 



1 06 
169 
203 

2IO 
223 



CASSEU., FETTER, AND GALPIN, BELLE SAUVAGE WORKS, LONDON, E.C. 



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